Are You Ready for EKRA? What You Need to Know Now About How this New Legislation Affects Your Lab

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As written, however, EKRA is far more expansive with its broad language enabling the federal government to monitor provider arrangements intended to generate business for any laboratory services, not just those related to individuals in treatment for substance abuse disorders, payable by a FHCP or commercial health insurer.
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Spotlight

Control of infection from methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a healthcare focus for more than 50 years. One of the reasons that active surveillance testing (AST) for MRSA is expected to be effective is that the greatest risk factor for developing clinical disease is to first become colonized in the nares with MRSA. Critically, persons who are either colonized or infected with MRSA are equally likely to have their skin and surrounding environment contaminated with this organism. Therefore, strategies to limit transmission that consider both colonized and infected persons are most likely to be successful at reducing disease. For healthcare organizations that do not have MRSA well controlled, the recent SHEA compendium recommends AST as one method to identify carriers and reduce spread to new patients. NorthShore University HealthSystem began an AST program for MRSA control on August 1, 2005 and realized a 70% reduction in clinical MRSA disease. Careful monitoring of patient benefit and cost reduction associated with lowered healthcare associated infection justifies the program to hospital administration. In 10 years the MRSA control program led to a net healthcare benefit of $20 million in reduced cost, with more than 1,000 infections avoided and 180 prevented deaths.

OTHER ON-DEMAND WEBINARS

The Collaborative Role of Technology and PharmD in Managing Chronic Conditions

Himsslearn

The prevalence and cost of chronic, cardiometabolic conditions like Type 2 Diabetes and Heart Disease is one of the greatest healthcare challenges we face today. Luckily, price points are coming down on cellular and Bluetooth-enabled medical devices like blood pressure cuffs and glucometers, and at the same time, enhanced interoperability capabilities are allowing us to seamlessly pull patient-generated data from the devices into analytics platforms and combine it with patient record data from the EHR. The connection gives clinicians a more complete view of their patients’ health whether at the point-of-care or virtually giving them the ability to detect costly complications before they happen, and prompting them to intervene with appropriate guideline-based management.
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Supporting Integrated Patient Care by Moving Tests Out of the Core Lab and into Physicians Offices

darkdaily

In an effort to reduce costs, many clinical laboratories and pathology groups have moved to a central lab system where almost all lab tests are sent. This has led to both patients and doctors incurring lengthy wait times often until the next day to learn the results, as well as myriad other inefficiencies.
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Women in Health IT at the Forefront of Addressing the Opioid Crisis

HIMSS Media

The objective of this webinar is to tie the opioid crisis with the Women in Health IT community to bring awareness to women’s voices in addressing the crisis. A panel of leaders at the federal and state levels and the HIE space will share their stories on how they came into their current work roles and what they are doing in those roles that ties to addressing the opioid crisis through information and technology.
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How Has COVID Permanently Changed Healthcare

COVID-19 transformed how we collectively delivered care in 2020. Not only are we seeing an upending of traditional health care settings, but patients increasingly expect to know the costs of their care ahead of time.
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Spotlight

Control of infection from methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a healthcare focus for more than 50 years. One of the reasons that active surveillance testing (AST) for MRSA is expected to be effective is that the greatest risk factor for developing clinical disease is to first become colonized in the nares with MRSA. Critically, persons who are either colonized or infected with MRSA are equally likely to have their skin and surrounding environment contaminated with this organism. Therefore, strategies to limit transmission that consider both colonized and infected persons are most likely to be successful at reducing disease. For healthcare organizations that do not have MRSA well controlled, the recent SHEA compendium recommends AST as one method to identify carriers and reduce spread to new patients. NorthShore University HealthSystem began an AST program for MRSA control on August 1, 2005 and realized a 70% reduction in clinical MRSA disease. Careful monitoring of patient benefit and cost reduction associated with lowered healthcare associated infection justifies the program to hospital administration. In 10 years the MRSA control program led to a net healthcare benefit of $20 million in reduced cost, with more than 1,000 infections avoided and 180 prevented deaths.

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