Will regulation limit the impact in health care?

TANUJ GUPTA | March 2, 2020

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Artificial intelligence (AI) introduces some important concerns around data ownership, safety and security, and with so much at stake, meaningful regulation should be expected. The pharmaceutical, clinical treatment and medical device industries provide a precedent for how to protect data rights, privacy and security and drive innovation in an AI-empowered health care system. We should expect the continued growth of AI applications for health care as more uses and benefits of the technology surface. I’ve given more than 100 presentations on artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) this past year. There’s no doubt these technologies are hot topics in health care that usher in great hope for the advancement of our industry. While they have the potential to transform patient care, quality and outcomes, there are also concerns about the negative impact this technology could have on human interaction, as well as the burden they could place on clinicians and health systems.

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