Universal coverage pragmatists and visionaries must work together in 2020

Proponents of universal health coverage currently fall into two groups pragmatists who propose a mix of incremental initiatives to achieve universal coverage, and visionaries, who prefer a single-payer approach that would eliminate private health insurance. While the presidential primary dynamics may exacerbate the differences between these camps, there are compelling reasons for both sides to come together and work on a common short-term agenda.

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St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, founded by the late entertainer Danny Thomas, is one of the world's premier centers for the research and treatment of pediatric cancer and other catastrophic childhood diseases. St. Jude is the first and only pediatric cancer center to be designated as a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute. Children from all 50 states and from around the world have come through the doors of St. Jude for treatment, and thousands more around the world have benefited from the research conducted at St. Jude - research that is shared freely with the global medical community. St. Jude is the only pediatric cancer research center where families never pay for treatments that are not covered by insurance. No child is denied treatment because of a family's inability to pay.

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

Top 10 Strategies for Healthcare Digital Marketing

Article | August 16, 2023

What is Healthcare Digital Marketing Digital marketing is a new wave in the world of healthcare marketing strategy. Using advanced technologies that use online marketing platforms such as websites, social media channels, and SEO techniques, to reach potential clients with healthcare products and services encompasses healthcare digital marketing. Digital marketing in the healthcare sector makes it easier to create, communicate, and deliver health information and make interventions regarding protecting and promoting the health of diverse populations. Strategies for Healthcare Digital Marketing There are many trending healthcare digital marketing strategies you can use beneficially in healthcare, but here are the top 10 trending strategies that can help you ensure success: Create a Wholesome Patient Experience on Your Website As part of effective healthcare digital marketing for your services, crafting a patient-focused website will help to provide a seamless experience for visitors. While it is important to create a website that you can optimize for search engines, it is also crucial to simplify the process for first-time as well as repeat visitors. Use a conversational tone and features that allow easy navigation so that patients don’t feel like they are being bombarded with medical jargon. Take a look at Mayo Clinic’s homepage. A patient's needs like online scheduling, specialist lookup, and contact information are easily available, while secondary information for those who would like to explore more before they make an appointment is below. This user-friendly healthcare digital marketing strategy will help you a lot in making visitors return to your website, and when they are looking for products and services. Employ a Responsive Web Design With more people leaving the confines of PCs to use the web easily and comfortably, ensuring that your website is responsive to various types of devices is paramount. This applies more to mobile devices because Google has introduced mobile-first indexing in September 2020. Branding Matters If you want to use healthcare digital marketing campaigns efficiently you have to identify what your organization as a brand can give patients. Even if it is healthcare, where target markets and organizational priorities are almost similar, patients need differentiating factors for each healthcare provider. If you don’t want a patient to be lost in the sea of white coats, figuring out what is special about what you can offer is crucial. Make sure your organizational goals and healthcare digital marketing goals are in sync to avoid unnecessary expenditure. Analyze your competition and let that assist you in shaping the path that your healthcare digital marketing strategy will take. You can often learn a lot from a competitor’s mistakes. Provide Blog Content That Is Optimized for SEO Symptom-related searches constitute 1% of all searches, that’s millions, on Google. Use this information to your benefit when planning your editorial calendar for blogs and include it efficiently in your healthcare digital marketing strategy. While you plan around national health observances, you can integrate long-tail keywords, provide links to reputed health sites and articles within your website, and invest in healthcare digital marketing plans. The four to five listings that show at the top of Google’s organic search results page are called the local pack—this part is vital for mobile users because it is all the screen can display before the user scrolls down. If you haven’t already, you should claim your healthcare website on Google My Business and keep it updated. Apart from this, healthcare digital content marketing plans need to be optimized for healthcare-specific SEO keywords. Supplement Blogs with Video Content With more algorithms prioritizing video content, you don’t want to be left behind without any good video content. In the healthcare industry, you have the added benefit of adding to your physician’s credibility if you create edutainment videos telling patients about their area of expertise. Healthcare video marketing can help you leverage the physicians in your organization that are authorities in their respective fields of medicine. Long and scary procedures being described by certified physicians is often reassuring for patients. Likewise, patient testimonials can pay this comforting reassurance forward, resulting in building a good reputation for your organization through similar healthcare digital marketing approaches. Take Advantage of Paid Advertising After you’ve created all this carefully crafted content that is optimized for SEO, you can’t just let it sit only on your website. Sometimes even if you maintain up-to-date business listings, Google’s local pack is overshadowed by paid ads. You have to promote it on search engines and social media platforms through pay-per-click (PPC), search, targeted, and display ads. Here you need a clear healthcare digital marketing strategy. Call-only campaigns and other ad extensions can be used to promote the services you offer as well. Leverage Social Media While organic social media campaigns are great, they can only get you so far. Using it as your only social media strategy can only give you subpar results compared to paid social campaigns. A paid social media plan is more than just clicking on ‘boost’, you have to create a strategy that suits your goals, targets the audience you need, and budgets for a specific ROI. You can create highly personalized campaigns without wasting your budget and reach the patients who are most likely to find your posts useful. It can be quite advantageous if you use healthcare social media marketing to your benefit while being tasteful in what you post. A healthcare care social media platform can be included in your healthcare digital marketing strategy. Set up an Email Strategy In healthcare, there are a few types of emails you can take advantage of, like reminders for appointments and annual physicals, seasonal tips for flu season, and announcements about new technology being used in your organization. Letting opportunities like these slip by is lost chances to keep patients engaged with your services and your patients also lose out on information that potentially could have been useful to them. Including a well-planned email marketing strategy as a part of your healthcare digital marketing plan will prevent patients from marking your email as spam and give you good open rates. Setting up free subscription-based newsletters as Johns Hopkins Medicine does allows you to prevent unnecessary unsubscribes as well. Follow-up with Patient Reviews and Feedback Word-of-mouth referrals have and always will be a part of marketing and healthcare digital marketing can help you evaluate the quality of the referrals you are getting. Patient success stories often inspire and evoke emotional responses from people, apart from serving as a way to show others the quality of the healthcare services you provide. Track Your Healthcare Digital Marketing Strategies After you’ve put all this effort into creating healthcare digital marketing strategies for email, social, and video you have to analyze where your budget is being spent the most, and whether it is reaping you the kind of benefits you are expecting. Understanding and capitalizing on patient micro-moments allows you to position your brand appropriately so that you are right there when they need your services. Measuring and studying your healthcare digital marketing conversion metrics is highly beneficial when it comes to using your resources to serve your needs best. It doesn’t hurt to track all the mediums you’re using to communicate with patients including calls that are made to your front desk. Analyzing this data can help you understand the blockers that lie in the path between a patient and doctor. A laggy scheduling system, long call-hold times, and patient misinformation are just some of the revelations this analysis can bring to light. Trends in Healthcare Digital Marketing Healthcare digital marketing plans were almost non-existent, but they slowly developed to include traditional marketing like print, direct mail, television, and radio. The limitations of these media can now be overcome with healthcare digital marketing. Doctor reviews, patient discussion forums, and physician certifications and availability are now an online search away for most patients. On-demand healthcare is becoming increasingly popular, and big data is playing a pivotal role in decreasing errors via patient record analyses and creating preventative plans for recurring emergency room patients. The future even holds possibilities for telesurgeries, telemedicine continues to grow, and virtual patient treatment and other emerging technologies are changing the landscape of healthcare digital marketing. High-risk patients are being aided by heart rate sensors, oximeters, and exercise trackers paving the way for increased investment in medical devices that can be worn. These devices give people a sense of agency when it comes to their health while creating room for gamification and considerable changes in healthcare insurance. Even with all these innovative changes, for healthcare digital marketers, one aspect will remain primary and this is the patient. Gone are the days when healthcare costs were affordable and patients were not proactive in researching which healthcare provider to choose. The modern patient has to be prudent in selecting the person responsible for improving their health, and it is your responsibility as a marketer to show them why your organization is the best. Stay updated with the latest healthcare digital marketing trends with webinars as the times are changing faster than ever. Frequently Asked Questions What is healthcare digital marketing? Marketing healthcare products and services with the use of advanced digital technologies and techniques are called healthcare digital marketing. These techniques can be Google AdWords campaigns, responsive websites, SEO tactics, mobile apps, unique landing pages, social media campaigns, and email marketing programs, and much more. Why is digital marketing important in healthcare? Healthcare providers are facing challenges everywhere, especially in marketing their products and services. So, as technology is evolving, to stay competitive and continue improving the patient experience, the healthcare industry should invest in healthcare digital marketing strategies. What is a healthcare marketing strategy? Healthcare marketing strategies support and promote the practices of healthcare providers and telemedicine providers. Healthcare digital marketing strategy includes many channels and forms to target the right patients in the right way at the right time.

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Digital Healthcare

Unlocking the Puzzle: Navigating EHR Interoperability Solutions

Article | November 29, 2023

Unlock EHR interoperability solutions with this article. Discover how healthcare overcomes EHR interoperability challenges to facilitate seamless information sharing for better clinical decisions. 1. Exploring Hurdles in EHR Interoperability 2. Addressing EHR Interoperability Challenges: Mapping Effective Paths 2.1 Upgrading from Outdated Legacy Systems 2.2 Managing Inconsistent Information Across Multiple Sources 2.3 Overcoming Organizational Resistance to Sharing Data 2.4 Balancing Security and Consent 2.5 Harmonizing Data Standards Across Diverse Software Systems 2.6 Optimizing Training Resources for EHR Interoperability 2.7 Strategizing Costs for Specialist-driven Interoperability Management 2.8 Navigating Budget Constraints in EHR Interoperability 2.9 Unifying Patient Identification Standards Across HIEs 2.10 Advancing Allergy Management to Enhance Patient Care 3. Embracing Interoperability for a Connected Healthcare Future 1.Exploring Hurdles in EHR Interoperability Despite significant efforts and investments in health information systems and technology, coupled with many years of widespread availability, the full benefits of electronic health records (EHRs) still need to be realized. The reality is that most physicians continue to rely on faxing and mailing patient records, just as they did a decade ago. Numerous government-certified EHR products are being used, each utilizing distinct clinical terminologies, technical specifications, and functional capabilities. These differences make it challenging to establish a unified standard interoperability format for data sharing. Interestingly, even EHR systems built on the same platform might not be interoperable, as they are frequently highly customized to an organization’s specific workflow and preferences. Given these circumstances, the article examines ten challenges and their corresponding EHR interoperability solutions to enhance patient care. 2.Addressing EHR Interoperability Challenges: Mapping Effective Paths The primary goal of healthcare interoperability is to enable seamless sharing of health-related information between healthcare providers and patients, aiding in clinical decision-making. Here are several challenges to accomplishing this aim, along with their corresponding interoperability solutions: 2. 1 Upgrading from Outdated Legacy Systems One of the significant challenges in achieving EHR interoperability is the need to transition from outdated legacy systems. Many healthcare facilities still rely on older, proprietary EHR systems that need more compatibility and standards to communicate seamlessly with modern, interconnected healthcare networks. These legacy systems often need more data exchange capabilities, leading to inefficiencies, data inconsistencies, and barriers to collaborative patient care. The intricate process of upgrading or replacing these systems while ensuring data integrity and continuity of care poses a considerable obstacle to achieving comprehensive EHR interoperability. Healthcare institutions need to implement a strategic and phased approach to address this challenge. This involves assessing the existing EHR, identifying interoperability gaps, and selecting modern healthcare interoperability solutions that adhere to industry standards, such as Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (HL7 FHIR) and open APIs. A well-defined migration plan should be developed, including data migration, new system integration, and staff training. Collaboration with EHR vendors, IT experts, and clinical stakeholders is crucial to ensuring a smooth transition. 2.2 Managing Inconsistent Information Across Multiple Sources As patients move through different healthcare settings and encounter various medical professionals, their health information becomes distributed across multiple sources, leading to discrepancies, duplications, and variations in data. This inconsistency can compromise patient safety, treatment accuracy, and healthcare quality. Furthermore, different institutions' varying data formats, coding systems, and documentation practices exacerbate the challenge of creating a unified and accurate patient record. A potential solution to this challenge involves developing and adopting standardized data exchange protocols. By implementing common data standards and practices, healthcare providers can ensure that patient information is accurately represented and uniformly understood across different systems. In addition, robust data validation processes and reconciliation algorithms can help identify and rectify inconsistencies during data integration. Moreover, creating a centralized patient identity management system that links various patient records to a single, accurate identity can significantly mitigate the issue of duplicated or mismatched information. 2.3 Overcoming Organizational Resistance to Sharing Data This EHR interoperability challenge pertains to the reluctance of healthcare institutions, clinics, and providers to readily exchange patient information and medical records due to concerns over data privacy, competitive advantage, and operational complexities. This resistance often leads to fragmented patient care, hindered medical research, and compromised clinical decision-making. Addressing this challenge necessitates the establishment of clear data-sharing protocols, robust privacy safeguards, and incentivized collaboration. By fostering a culture of trust, emphasizing the collective benefits of data exchange, and implementing interoperability standards, the healthcare ecosystem can encourage reluctant organizations to actively share essential patient data, ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes and more efficient healthcare delivery. 2.4 Balancing Security and Consent This challenge in EHR interoperability revolves around the delicate equilibrium between ensuring patient data security and privacy while enabling the seamless sharing of EHRs across different healthcare systems. Striking the right balance involves addressing concerns about unauthorized access, data breaches, and patient consent preferences. While robust security measures are necessary to safeguard sensitive health information, overly stringent restrictions can hinder the efficient exchange of vital medical data, potentially impeding timely and informed patient care, medical research, and healthcare system efficiency. Potential EHR interoperability solutions to this challenge include implementing a layered security and consent management approach. This involves combining strong encryption, authentication protocols, and access controls to ensure the integrity and confidentiality of EHRs. Moreover, the adoption of standardized and granular consent mechanisms empowers patients to regulate both access to their data and the purposes for which it can be accessed. An integrated framework that employs advanced technologies like blockchain for secure audit trails and data-sharing logs can enhance transparency and accountability. Furthermore, patient education and awareness campaigns can empower individuals to make informed data-sharing decisions, fostering a collaborative environment where security, consent, and interoperability coexist harmoniously. 2.5 Harmonizing Data Standards Across Diverse Software Systems This challenge encompasses integrating and exchanging medical data across various software platforms and applications used within the healthcare industry. To tackle this challenge, a comprehensive solution includes the widespread adoption and adherence to standardized data formats, coding conventions, and communication protocols by developers, healthcare organizations, and EHR integration software. To address this challenge, a comprehensive solution involves the establishment of standardized data formats, coding conventions, and communication protocols widely adopted and adhered to by EHR software developers and healthcare organizations. This could be achieved through industry collaboration, government regulations, and incentives for adopting interoperability standards. Additionally, implementing APIs that translate and map data between different formats can help bridge the gap between diverse software systems. 2.6 Optimizing Training Resources for EHR Interoperability This hurdle involves preparing healthcare professionals, IT staff, and other stakeholders to effectively navigate and implement interoperable EHR systems. Ensuring that healthcare personnel possess the necessary skills and knowledge to seamlessly integrate, maintain, and utilize interconnected EHR systems amidst rapidly evolving technology and standards poses a significant hurdle. This challenge involves understanding the intricacies of interoperability protocols and grasping the broader context of data security, patient privacy, and efficient data exchange among diverse healthcare entities. To address this challenge, developing comprehensive and up-to-date training programs that cover both technical aspects (interoperability standards, APIs, and data formats) and practical considerations (security protocols, data governance) is crucial. Collaborations with vendors, industry experts, and academia can ensure the training content remains aligned and updated with current EHR trends. Integrating EHR interoperability education into medical and IT curricula can also lay a foundation for future professionals. Continuous learning opportunities, including EHR analytics courses, certifications, and knowledge-sharing platforms, can further bolster the continual development of skills and knowledge exchange. This process cultivates a skilled workforce capable of fully leveraging EHR interoperability while upholding the integrity and privacy of patient data. 2.7 Strategizing Costs for Specialist-driven Interoperability Management This challenge pertains to the complex and costly task of ensuring seamless data exchange among diverse EHR systems, mainly when managed by specialists with domain-specific knowledge. These specialists play a crucial role in tailoring EHR interoperability solutions to the unique needs of their medical domains. Still, the financial implications of such endeavors can be substantial, involving customization, integration, and maintenance expenses. Finding an effective solution requires a multi-faceted approach involving standardized interoperability frameworks, modular system design, strategic resource allocation, and collaborative partnerships among EHR vendors, healthcare institutions, and specialists. By optimizing the balance between customization and standardization and leveraging technological advances like APIs and cloud computing, healthcare ecosystems can mitigate costs while achieving efficient and secure data exchange that benefits patients and healthcare providers. 2.8 Navigating Budget Constraints in EHR Interoperability This issue relates to healthcare organizations' significant financial limitations when striving to establish seamless EHR data exchange across disparate systems. As healthcare entities aim to enhance patient care coordination and data accessibility, the cost of implementing and maintaining interoperable EHR systems becomes a substantial hurdle. This challenge necessitates a delicate balance between allocating resources for EHR integration, customization, and ongoing maintenance while ensuring that patient data remains secure and accessible to authorized stakeholders. A possible avenue to deal with the budget constraints in EHR interoperability is the strategic adoption of open-source frameworks. By leveraging open-source solutions, healthcare organizations can reduce licensing fees and development costs associated with proprietary systems, allowing them to allocate resources more efficiently. Additionally, collaborating with industry consortia and governmental initiatives that promote standardized data exchange protocols can foster economies of scale, streamlining the implementation process. Moreover, investing in cloud-based technologies can offer scalable and cost-effective data storage and sharing infrastructure. 2.9 Unifying Patient Identification Standards Across HIEs The crux of this issue involves the need for consistent patient identification methods across different healthcare systems and data-sharing networks. This inconsistency results in errors, data duplication, and compromised patient safety as information is exchanged between entities. Without a standardized patient identification system, accurate matching of patient records becomes a complex endeavor, hindering the seamless exchange of EHRs and undermining the potential benefits of interoperability. To address this challenge, a comprehensive solution involves establishing and adopting a universally recognized patient identification standard that spans all participating HIEs. This standard could include using unique patient identifiers or a combination of demographic, biometric, and cryptographic identifiers to ensure accurate and secure patient matching. Additionally, implementing advanced data governance practices, strong privacy protections, and robust data validation algorithms would enhance the accuracy and security of patient identification. Collaboration between healthcare organizations, government agencies, and technology experts is crucial to developing and implementing this standardized approach, fostering a more interconnected and effective healthcare ecosystem while safeguarding patient privacy and data integrity. 2.10 Advancing Allergy Management to Enhance Patient Care Healthcare providers need help seamlessly sharing allergy-related patient data across different EHR platforms, hindering comprehensive patient care. This lack of interoperability leads to fragmented information, potential medication errors, and compromised treatment decisions, ultimately impacting patient safety and outcomes. One viable solution for addressing this challenge is to establish standardized data exchange protocols alongside a unified health information exchange framework. Implementing FHIR standards can enable the consistent and secure sharing of allergy information among EHR systems. Additionally, incentivizing healthcare organizations to adopt these interoperability EHR standards and invest in compatible technologies will promote a cohesive ecosystem where allergy data can be accurately and swiftly exchanged. Collaborative efforts among EHR vendors, healthcare providers, and regulatory bodies are essential to ensure the seamless flow of allergy-related information, resulting in enhanced patient care, reduced medical errors, and improved healthcare efficiency. 3.Embracing Interoperability for a Connected Healthcare Future With the goal of a cohesive healthcare future in mind, the value of embracing interoperability is immeasurable. This article highlights the essential role of interoperability in overcoming the challenges posed by fragmented data and improving patient outcomes. As healthcare systems continue to develop, the smooth exchange of EHRs becomes crucial, fostering collaboration among diverse stakeholders and facilitating well-informed decision-making. By creating an environment in which EHRs can seamlessly communicate, healthcare providers have the potential to offer more comprehensive, patient-centered care, minimize duplication, and expedite both diagnoses and treatments. Although achieving an interoperable healthcare ecosystem may involve complexity, the benefits of efficiency, precision, and overall quality of care underscore its necessity as a transformative journey.

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

Boost Your Lab's Efficiency with LIMS Software

Article | July 14, 2023

Contents 1. Getting Started with LIMS Software 2. Benefits of Incorporating LIMS Software into Lab Management 3. LIMS Software Classification 4. Selecting the Right LIMS Software: A Comparison of Variants 5. How LIMS Software Revolutionized Laboratory Management 6. Future Scope 1. Getting Started with LIMS Software Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) software automates laboratory operations, improves productivity, and ensures the accuracy as well as reliability of laboratory data. It can be implemented in clinical laboratories, research & development labs, and environmental testing labs and tailored to meet specific needs. LIMS software seamlessly integrates with other laboratory systems, such as electronic lab notebooks and scientific data management systems. LIMS class software enables storing and managing all information in one place, improving day-to-day work. Yet, research reveals that still 40% of industry leaders 'had not embarked on applying digital to research and development or quality control labs'. (Source: Accenture) 2. Benefits of Incorporating LIMS Software into Lab Management By implementing LIMS software, laboratories can significantly reduce time spent locating samples and records, entering data, and generating reports. LIMS software also offers additional advantages when integrated into laboratory management, such as 1. Optimizing: LIMS automates laboratory processes, allowing for a paperless environment and increased productivity. It also ensures accurate test results by preventing the use of outdated instruments. 2. Automating: LIMS facilitates the input of essential sample information, including its source, date, time, and location of the collection as well as processing data. 3. Compliant: LIMS helps labs follow FDA regulations by creating an audit trail that tracks all activities, including record creation, modification, and deletion. It also enables electronic signatures to authenticate key activities and keep data secure and traceable. 4. Collaborative: LIMS streamlines inter-laboratory collaboration through the option to share data access. This allows lab technicians from disparate laboratories to be seamlessly assigned to different projects and obtain the required information without disruption. 5. Security: LIMS systems offer various mechanisms for managing user access, such as an in-built user management system with a unique username and password, integration with LDAP or Active Directory for user authentication, and access through an Identity Server. 3. LIMS Software Classification Laboratory Information Management System software can be classified based on several criteria, including functionality, deployment model, industry focus, and the laboratory's needs. Here is a list of critical features that can be considered while classifying LIMS software: 1. Functionality: Different LIMS software may have varying functionality, including sample tracking, data management, instrument integration, quality control, workflow management, and reporting. 2. Deployment Model: LIMS software can be deployed on-premises or in the cloud. On-premises deployment means that the software is installed and run on the laboratory's own servers, while cloud-based deployment means that the software is hosted and maintained by a third-party provider. 3. Industry Focus: LIMS software can be designed for specific industries or applications, such as pharmaceutical research, clinical laboratories, food and beverage testing, environmental testing, and more. 4. Open-Source vs. Proprietary: LIMS software can also be classified as either open-source or proprietary. Open-source software is freely available and can be modified by users, while a company owns proprietary software and requires a license to use it. 5. Scalability: The size of the laboratory and the number of users accessing the LIMS software can also be a factor in classification. Some LIMS software may be more scalable, allowing for easy expansion as the laboratory grows. 6. Integration Capabilities: LIMS software can also be classified based on its ability to integrate with other software or instruments. Some LIMS software may be more flexible and have better integration capabilities than others, allowing for seamless data exchange between different systems. 4. Selecting the Right LIMS Software: A Comparison of Variants While selecting the most appropriate LIMS variant, the wide range of available options can pose a challenge for laboratory decision-makers. To aid in this selection process, a comprehensive comparative analysis of LIMS variants is presented below: 1. Lab managers can adopt an objective approach for evaluating and comparing different LIMS solutions by creating a grading rubric. This involves designing a table with separate columns for each LIMS vendor and rows listing the desired features as well as functionalities. To provide a more comprehensive evaluation, advanced rubrics may include rating each functionality on a particular LIMS using a scale of 1 to 5. 2. Next, it is crucial to review how LIMS solutions are structured and stored. This includes determining whether the solution is on-premise or cloud-based, either as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) or software-as-a-service (SaaS). For optimal flexibility in the laboratory's computing structure, choosing a vendor that offers LIMS as a comprehensive solution is advantageous. 3. Data access must be controlled by using unique user IDs and passwords. Furthermore, data security standards such as HIPAA compliance and SSL encryption will likely be mandatory across many laboratory industries. It is thus imperative to carefully consider and ensure the security features of any potential LIMS solution. 4. To assess the level of support that can be expected with a particular LIMS, one effective method is to directly inquire with the software vendor about outages, response time, and plans of action to address any glitches preemptively. Managing expectations around the LIMS requires asking about the frequency of LIMS updates, including how often the platform is updated, how updates are announced and deployed, and the expected duration of any update-related outages. 5. While selecting a LIMS solution, laboratories must establish a target go-live date, especially when implementing the system in response to, or preparation for, an audit. Software vendors should provide a deployment and implementation timeline, which can be used to compare with the laboratory's objectives and goals. This helps to ensure that the LIMS solution is implemented in a timely and efficient manner. 5. How LIMS Software Revolutionized Laboratory Management LIMS software has fundamentally revolutionized the laboratory management system in several ways. Before the advent of LIMS, laboratory operations were often paper-based and highly manual, leading to inefficiencies, errors, and inconsistencies. However, with the implementation of LIMS, laboratories have become more efficient, accurate, and compliant. LIMS has also improved laboratory productivity, allowing scientists to focus on higher-value tasks like data analysis and interpretation. It has enabled collaboration between different laboratories, facilitating communication and knowledge sharing between scientists, researchers, and analysts, and is also leading to more significant innovation and progress in the field of science and research. 6. Future Scope The future scope of Laboratory Information Management System software is promising as it continues to evolve and adapt to the changing needs of laboratory management. Potential developments include integrating emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, and robotics, cloud-based solutions for scalability and accessibility, IoT integration for automation and safety, enhanced data analytics for improved decision-making, and mobile applications for on-the-go access. Moreover, with SaaS LIMS, there are no license costs, minimal installation fees, and no need for in-house servers or databanks, resulting in reduced IT maintenance costs for hardware and software.

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Effective ways to Speed-up your Health Tech Sales Cycle

Article | February 18, 2021

Your sales cycle encompasses every action you take to close a new customer as a salesperson. But there is a possibility for the sales cycle to be confused with sales methodology. Sales methodology is a framework in which one practices a sales cycle. Whereas the sales cycle is the step-by-step process of you, as a salesperson, to close a deal with a client. Piper Drive, a sales CRM and pipeline management platform defines a sales cycle as the series of predictable phases required to sell a product or a service, and that sales cycles can vary greatly among organizations, products, and services, and no one sale will be the same. Especially with the healthcare industry, a thorough understanding of your health tech sales cycle will make your sales operations more efficient. Shortening the sales cycle without an up-front investment for sales is one of the critical healthcare sales and marketing goals. If you shorten your health tech sales cycle, you get more time to make additional leads. This will ultimately result in having an improved bottom line. A faster and shorter sales cycle can bring you more advantages in the competitive sales world of your industry. It will indeed allow your company to grow its business by improving market share. Have you ever thought, as a salesperson, about the effective ways to shorten the health tech sales cycle? This article mainly focuses on proactive ways to shorten your sales cycle and improve profitability. Challenges of Long B2B Health Tech Sales Cycle According to Marketing Sherpa, a market research institute, the length of the sales cycle can vary from industry to industry. Comparatively, the health tech industry has a longer sales cycle. Still, there are many effective ways to shorten it and bring a positive impact on your sales process. In general, B2B sales take a lot of time to maintain. Thus, the B2B health tech sales cycle takes even months to close a sale with a prospect and faces many challenges in the process. Some of the challenges you may face, as a health tech salesperson, can be the following on the process: Turning the Lead to a Sales-Ready Prospect No health tech salesperson will find a lead ready to make the sale without any persuasion from you. In the health tech sales cycle, lead nurturing should be your best bet to convert a prospect. With longer sales cycles, it won't be easy to nurture a lead all through the process and make a sales-ready prospect. It would be easier to convert leads when they are ready if you keep in touch with the prospects. People often find it difficult to do so in the long health tech sales cycle and end up not converting potential clients into happy customers. Maintaining Engagement Over Time The sales team keeps converting leads on their radar. As days and months pass, it is challenging to memorize each prospect you have interacted with. Neglecting them brings nothing to your business. It can be a juggle to balance new prospects with existing SQLs. Older ones may get lost in the weeds as new leads come in. No one can tell which one is a higher priority. Whom will you pay more attention to and for how long? It can be a severe obstacle in the long B2B health tech sales cycle. Keeping Your Sales Team Energized If your sales team is not engaged with the process itself and enjoys it, they will have a more challenging time dealing with leads. It is a fact that, unfortunately, salespeople can become frustrated or bored due to working with difficult and hesitant leads. As the health tech sales cycle drags on, it is tough to remain emotionally calm. If you have no strategies to energize them promptly, apathy or discouragement may come into play. Ensuring Marketing and Sales Alignment Lack of communication between the sales and healthcare marketing teams can pose the most detrimental challenges. It can impact the health tech sales cycle seriously. This loss of alignment between marketing and sales can hurt lead nurturing and lead to further difficulties like the ones listed above. When the two teams move out of sync, it often requires a lot of effort to get them on the same page again. These teams can work separately with decisions and different goals, but it would not benefit the entire company. Five Stages of the Typical Sales Cycle It is better to understand the five stages of the health tech sales cycle to comprehend how the sales cycle comes into play completely. Prospect This is the stage where the sales team attracts leads and listens to them, and learns to offer what they need. Connect This is the stage for you to get leads to move forward with your offers. You can utilize all the data you have amassed during prospecting. Research As a salesperson, this is when you learn about leads and determine whether the prospect intends to buy. Present In this stage of the health tech sales cycle, you offer your product or services as an effective solution for your lead's pain points. Close It’s a fit! By now, you know if your lead wants your product or service and move forward. Benefits of Shortening your Sales Cycle A shorter health tech sales cycle allows you to meet more prospects within the same time frame. For example, if you take one week for each prospect to complete the cycle, you can meet more people than with a two-week average life cycle for a single prospect. As you meet more people, it allows you to make more money. Moreover, most of the prospects prefer to have shorter sales cycles provided that you fulfill their need and solve their problem. However, even with a short health tech sales cycle, you should have an effective method to track sales information. Along with a short sales cycle, an effective method will increase your team’s efficiency and sales numbers. You will make more profits and improve your sales cycle. Ways to Shorten your Long Health Tech Sales Cycle One of the significant challenges faced by healthcare technology salespeople is shortening their health tech sales cycle. Unlike B2C, the B2B process of sales has to deal with many decision-makers and educate them about the value of your products. Typically, it takes a lot of time and effort to convince your prospects that your solution is customized to meet their unique needs. However, your health tech sales cycle can become agonizingly long as each prospect can have a different perspective about your solution. It can also occur due to the number of people involved in the decision-making in B2B companies. According to the latest Demand Gen Report, the buyer’s journey is getting more complicated and longer. This makes the sales process worse, which is already tedious. However, the good news is that you can follow these marketing strategies to shorten your health tech sales cycle tactically. Understand Your Buyer Personas Keep yourself away from trying to engage the wrong people. This will not bring you any results in the end. Before commencing the sales process, you should have a clear idea of who your targeted audience is. The decision-makers or influencers in the organizations you are targeting are your buyer personas. After identifying your personas, by answering the following questions, you can outline their qualities: • What are their goals? • What are their responsibilities? • What trigger drives them to buy? • What problems are they dealing with? • How do they like to research? • What inhibits a purchase? As you answer these questions, you will get a clear idea of the best way to approach them. Send an Introductory Video The prospects get to know the salesperson only in the in-person meeting. So before the in-person meeting, you can consider sending them an introduction video. This would add value and explain why you are interested in them with a ‘call-to-action. It creates familiarity by the time you connect with them. This is a very creative step to shorten your health tech sales cycle. Provide Pre-Sales Appointment Content Having a sales appointment with a prospect, who does not know anything about your solution, is one of the biggest mistakes you can make in your health tech sales cycle. This means you may have to have several meetings to convince the client. This problem can be eliminated with a lead nurturing email with informative content. This email can have a link to an informative blog about your product, which was written previously. It will make them peruse your website before the actual sales meeting with you. It saves your time by eliminating many meetings to educate the prospect about your product. Provide Post-Sales Appointment Content The prospect is expected to come out with some concerns and objections after the first sales appointment. As a healthcare tech company salesperson, it is your responsibility to eliminate all those obstacles by addressing them strategically. Sending follow-up emails, videos, and case studies helps address those concerns. The content can be used to guide other prospects too. Overcoming these obstacles with effective content can shorten your health tech sales cycle effectively. Come Clean with Pricing Pricing of your products can be one of the main concerns for your prospects. Many salespeople address it only at the last stage of the health tech sales cycle. Not revealing the price at the beginning will only lengthen your process. Moreover, it may result in losing trust in you. Be transparent and reveal the price, to save yourself from such issues. Leverage Social Proof One of the smartest ways to win the trust of your prospect is to provide social proof. It will also make the deal close sooner. The best social proofs are case studies with the impact of your products or ROI. Remember to make that the company featured in the case study is similar to the particular prospect's company. In the health tech sales cycle, it is crucial to thoroughly understand the prospect. Your sales cycle should connect with the process of lead nurturing, where you act as an advisor. This will also help you build trust with the prospects and increase your chances of closing the deal before the expected time. Executing all of these alone would be challenging. At Media7, we help companies market their healthcare technology product with innovative strategies and support by implementing these strategies effectively. Our strategies help attract prospects, convert them and turn them into your happy customers forever. To know more about us, visit https://media7.com/ Frequently Asked Questions What are the stages in the health tech sales cycle? B2B health tech sales cycles include seven main stages. They are sales prospecting, making contact, qualifying the lead, nurturing the lead, making an offer, handling objections, and closing the sale. Following these steps help a salesperson to close the sale effectively. How does the health tech sales cycle help? The health tech sales cycle helps you identify potential clients and nurture them through the process of sales. It makes you effectively and efficiently guide your clients and gives them the confidence to go forward with more effort. What are the best practices for the health tech sales cycle? The best practices for the health tech sales cycle can be attracting more prospects through content marketing, building trust by understanding clients better, focusing on your customers' clients, and knowing the prospect’s organizational chart. Why is the sales cycle important in health tech? The sales cycle in the health tech industry helps the sales managers to forecast the accurate picture of your sales. This because they know where your salespersons are in the sales cycle. It also gives a clear picture of how many deals your salespeople close out of a given number of leads.

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