Top 10 Best Practices for EHR Ethical Issues

Top 10 Best Practices

Discover the potential of EHR implementation in revolutionizing clinical processes. Uncover strategies for addressing EHR ethical issues, ensuring integration that prioritizes patient-centered care.

Amidst the fusion of healthcare and technology, integrating electronic health records (EHRs) has emerged as a transformative element in modern medical practice. As a digital repository for a patient's medical journey, EHRs present unprecedented prospects for elevated care quality, improved data accessibility, and cost-effectiveness. Nevertheless, these advancements bring forth an array of EHR ethical issues that demand meticulous attention. In this context, establishing and adhering to the best practices for the ethical training of EHRs assumes paramount importance and a moral obligation. By skillfully navigating the intricate convergence of technology, patient confidentiality, and conscientious healthcare, these ethical EHR best practices illuminate the path toward a future where innovation and ethical principles harmoniously coexist.

1. Upholding Privacy and Confidentiality

Revealing a patient's information to external parties should strictly happen with the patient's explicit consent or within the parameters defined by legal regulations. Data stemming from clinical interactions is confidential and requires rigorous protection. The effective operation of EHRs requires authorized access by healthcare institutions, insurers, and related entities. Access by users is contingent upon predefined role-based privileges. The administrator identifies users, specifies the extent of information accessibility, and allocates exclusive usernames and passwords. Users must be conscientious about responsibly utilizing the information they access within their designated roles. Therefore, assigning user privileges plays a pivotal role in securing medical records. However, while regulating data access remains crucial, it doesn’t completely ensure confidentiality. Strengthening security through comprehensive privacy and security protocols remains essential for reinforcing patient data's inviolabilit.


2. Safeguarding Against Data Breaches

Ensuring patient privacy and safeguarding sensitive medical data is paramount in EHR ethical training. The imperatives of inadequate data security, encompassing compromised medical information, unauthorized access due to weak password safeguards, and the lack of encryption, accentuate the immediate need for a holistic approach. Employing strategies such as secure cloud storage, robust password protocols, two-factor authentication, and encryption is pivotal in enhancing data security, preventing the mishandling of patient records, and abiding by ethical standards. The potential legal and financial consequences of breaches underscore the criticality of these practices in maintaining patient trust and confidentiality within the digital healthcare domain.


3. EHR System Implementation

The integration of EHRs within healthcare organizations poses significant challenges, including resource waste, provider dissatisfaction, diminished patient trust, and potential safety risks. Successful EHR development, implementation, and upkeep demand substantial investment and collaboration among stakeholders, including clinicians, IT experts, educators, and consultants. Clinicians' active engagement is often underestimated, leading to the failure of EHR projects; therefore, clinician-led guidance is crucial in tasks such as EHR selection, workflow design, and quality improvement. Thoroughly mapping workflows before selecting an EHR is crucial, while maintaining user-friendly interfaces remains essential for success. Neglecting these aspects can reduce efficiency, compromise care, and increase safety threats. By prioritizing comprehensive planning, engaging clinicians, and optimizing user interfaces, healthcare institutions can ensure ethical and efficient EHR integration, ultimately enhancing patient care and safety.


4. Maintaining Data Accuracy

Upholding data accuracy stands as a fundamental principle in the ethical EHR domain. The integrity of information guarantees its unaltered and precise nature, contributing significantly to the enhancement of patient safety, reduction of healthcare errors, mitigation of health disparities, and betterment of public health. Nevertheless, concerns have been voiced regarding the reliability of data input into electronic records. The improper utilization of functionalities such as 'cut and paste' can lead to misleading portrayals of a patient's condition and treatment, breaching ethical standards. This practice poses elevated risks to patients and increases the liability of clinicians and institutions. Challenges also arise from drop-down menus that limit a clinician's choices, potentially giving rise to substantial errors, especially under time constraints. The collaborative efforts of clinicians and vendors can address software concerns, promoting user-friendly, reliable EHRs while tackling EHR ethical issues. Furthermore, data loss during transfers raises pertinent concerns about the accuracy of the database, a critical aspect as patient care decisions hinge on this data.


5. Guaranteeing Data Authenticity

The assurance of documentation integrity pertains to the accurate and precise nature of the comprehensive health record. This includes principles of information governance, identifying patients, validating authorship, handling amendments and corrections in records, and auditing documentation validity while submitting reimbursement claims. EHR tools offer flexible documentation options through the utilization of templates and smart phrases, assisting in precise record-keeping. However, if these tools are misused, doubts about data integrity can arise, making information unreliable and possibly raising concerns about fraudulent activity. Established policies and procedures, including audit functions, must be in place to ensure proper billing. With adequate safeguards, records may accurately represent the patient's condition at admission and over time. Providers must understand the importance of reviewing and refining default data to ensure that only patient-specific information for that visit is recorded. In contrast, irrelevant data from default templates is removed.


6. Validating Dictation to Prevent Errors

Voice recognition systems lacking a validation step pose considerable challenges in maintaining data accuracy and preventing documentation errors within organizations, particularly when it comes to ethical issues with electronic health records. EHR companies need to implement a protocol requiring providers to promptly assess, modify, and validate dictated information. Given these documents' frequent use and sharing, precise and high-quality documentation in EHR systems is of utmost significance. The adoption of EHRs has led to substantial shifts in provider workflows and documentation processes. However, providers still need to clearly outline or fully understand comprehensive best practices for maintaining high-quality documentation in EHRs. Advancements are necessary to enhance documentation tools and methods, with a renewed emphasis on the essential aspects of data accuracy and quality. This should precede the widespread implementation of interoperable health information exchange initiatives.


7. Ensuring Accurate Documentation

Maintaining the integrity of documentation is compromised when incorrect information finds its way onto the wrong patient's health record. Patient identification errors can influence clinical decisions, endanger patient safety, violate privacy and security, and lead to redundant testing and escalated expenses for patients as well as providers. The propagation of patient identification mistakes can rapidly expand within EHR, personal health records, and Health Information Exchange (HIE) networks as information disseminates. Failing to implement advanced front-end solutions that incorporate robust matching algorithms or innovative techniques like biometrics or fingerprinting can expose organizations to risk. EHRs can incorporate targeted alerts to anticipate safety problems, like blood type inconsistencies or allergies, during treatment, addressing EHR issues. Organizations must institute a patient identity integrity program, integrating performance improvement metrics to monitor error rates and duplicate records in their electronic master patient index. Policies and procedures must ensure the accuracy of critical demographic data, facilitating the linkage of records within and across systems. Addressing the initial point of data capture as a primary front-end verification is also vital within policies.


8. Preserving the Authenticity of Audit Trails

Effective audits are crucial to ensuring that the health record documentation aligns with the reported level of service, fulfills reimbursement requirements set by payers, and guarantees that only authorized personnel access patient medical records and make entries. The audit trail must encompass the user's name, the triggering application, workstation details, the specific document, a description of the audited event (such as amendments, corrections, or deletions), and the timestamp. This audit trail outlines modifications (including deletions) within the health record and provides auditors with a foundation for compliance audits. Inadequate audit trail functionality within EHRs raises concerns about the integrity of health record documentation, potentially exposing organizations to legal liabilities and inadvertently fostering or shielding criminal activities. It may become challenging to ascertain if corrections or amendments were executed, who authorized the changes, or the nature of the modifications. In addition to the inherent unintentional errors that documentation might encounter, audit trail functionality can aid in detecting instances where records are altered to obstruct the disclosure of detrimental information. Organizations can utilize EHR trends to leverage audit trail features for identifying and analyzing patterns in health record usage. Typically, users can generate reports over specific time frames categorized by provider or provider type, with results directed to a compliance committee or the organization's governing body.


9. Fostering Compliance Awareness

Enhancing ethical EHR training involves a strategic focus on ensuring providers are well-versed in compliance and legal risks, starting from the EHR training phase. To address EHR problems, organizations should implement educational initiatives aimed at mitigating compliance issues. Staff education must emphasize the integrity of health record documentation, with a continuous program monitored and provided quarterly or annually. Addressing the 'who, what, why, and how' ensures a solid grasp of organizational practices that uphold individual best practices, encompassing identifying potential fraud, universal and administrative security measures, data validity, authorship, continual education's significance, and strategies for daily fraud prevention.


10. Conducting Feedback Sessions

Contrary to common assumptions, ongoing training is essential post-EHR implementation. After installing the EHR and initiating patient interactions, challenges inevitably emerge—be it staff unfamiliarity with functions or the need to revamp workflow processes. Promptly identifying these concerns to prevent errors and swiftly resolving them involves collecting feedback from EHR users among the staff, particularly in relation to EHR ethical issues. During the weeks after the system's launch, contemplate arranging routine meetings to gather insights. Ensuring diverse representation, including clinical staff, physicians, administrators, billing, and front desk personnel, is crucial. Seek input on their adaptation to changes and areas requiring improvement. Determine if specific training concepts need reinforcement. Surveys can be used in place of frequent meetings. Subsequently, prioritizing problem areas aids focused resolution by promptly addressing critical matters. The introduction of incremental changes helps staff adapt to the EHR seamlessly, safeguarding patient care continuity during the transition.


The Path Ahead

Following these ethical EHR training best practices ensures the accuracy and reliability of patient data, leading to improved clinical decision-making and patient safety. By maintaining documentation integrity, professionals can confidently provide quality care and reduce the risk of errors. Ethical EHR training further strengthens compliance with legal regulations, safeguarding both the organization as well as the healthcare provider from potential legal liabilities. Moreover, adhering to best practices promotes efficient workflows, enhancing productivity, and streamlining operations. Patient trust and confidence are strengthened as professionals demonstrate their commitment to data security, confidentiality, and ethical conduct. Ultimately, by upholding ethical EHR training standards, professionals contribute to a robust healthcare system by fostering positive patient outcomes, maintaining trust, and supporting the principles of ethical healthcare delivery.

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NIS2 Cybersecurity Rules are Coming: Are You Ready?

Article | July 14, 2023

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5 Ways AI is Likely to Benefit Medicine & Improve Patient Care

Article | September 7, 2023

Since ChatGPT’s launch in November 2022, artificial intelligence (AI) tools have become disruptive to nearly every industry. While there's been controversy about whether AI would benefit the healthcare industry, it has proven to be just as capable in healthcare as in other sectors. In the medical field, there is reason to believe AI tools may be an even more reliable and useful resource than other sectors. Medical students have been panicking over AI's threat to their career prospects. But as these systems mature, the experts increasingly believe that AI may serve as a counterpart to human medical expertise rather than a threat. How AI Tools Are Expected to Aid Medical Professionals? Again and again, as the debate over modern AI tools rages on, we encounter the analogy of the calculator. No one feels threatened by calculators, not even professional mathematicians. Instead of throwing up their hands, math experts embrace the power of these now archaic computerized devices. If the experts are correct, this may be similar to the future of the alliance between AI and humans. According to the designers and programmers who understand how these systems work as well as how information technology tends to progress, AI can be expected to help the medical profession in the following ways: Cosmetic Surgery Consultations One of the farthest-reaching applications we see develop is in consultations for plastic surgery and similar applications. Perhaps one of the easiest aspects to understand is hair-loss consultations. In our practice, we use a device known as HairMetrix, which uses an AI-driven analytical system to help determine what is causing a patient to lose their hair and which treatment options would be the most effective. Because it is AI-driven, it is fully based on visual scans and is completely non-invasive. Just like this, AI can be used in an abundance of other ways to minimize the use of exploratory surgery and improve healthcare outcomes. Improved Diagnostics Artificial intelligence is already helping medical providers deliver diagnoses more quickly. These tools can identify anomalies that might otherwise take human hours or even weeks to identify. This has improved the rate of cancer detection, among other things, which will predictably improve survival rates. Developing New Pharmaceuticals The development of new medicines is notoriously slow. Not only is testing a painstaking process, but even seeking FDA approval can take years. AI is expected to help the development of pharmaceuticals through simulation on the molecular level, allowing researchers to see how the active mechanisms in a drug will work in the body. Improved Administrative Efficiency In the medical field, administrative tasks are notoriously slow. It is believed that generative AI will be able to automate many administrative functions and innumerable office chores. It could streamline sorting patient files, accelerate the interpretation of data, and much more. Patient Access In an area where information technology is already improving patients' lives, access to medical advice is still a bottleneck in the system. AI tools have the potential to slowly bridge the gap in health disparities. Combined with the power to diagnose, this could dramatically increase the capability of online patient portals. Of course, this list of anticipated AI capabilities is far from exhaustive. Researchers and medical professionals have high hopes for these tools, and some are already proving to be more than mere speculation. In a world where AI is reshaping industries at an unprecedented pace, the healthcare sector stands poised to benefit significantly from this technological revolution. From streamlining administrative tasks to revolutionizing diagnostics, the potential of AI in medicine is vast and diverse. As we witness AI-enabled tools like HairMetrix, enhancing the cosmetic surgery consultations and AI algorithms expediting diagnostic accuracy, it's clear that we are only at the beginning of a healthcare transformation that is set to improve patient care, increase survival rates, and revolutionize medical practices.

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Article | September 8, 2023

Embark on a journey into the frontier of healthcare innovation in this article. Discover how EHR telemedicine and remote patient monitoring serve as catalysts, driving forward a new era in healthcare. Contents 1. Integration of EHRs in Telemedicine and Remote Patient Monitoring 2. Technical Challenges and Solutions in EHR Integration 3. Financial Analysis: Cost-Benefit Assessment of Integration 4. Data Privacy and Consent in Integrated EHR-Telemedicine Systems 5. Forging Stronger Patient-Clinician Relationships 1. Integration of EHRs in Telemedicine and Remote Patient Monitoring EHR telemedicine and remote patient monitoring have reshaped healthcare delivery by seamlessly integrating electronic health records, allowing healthcare providers and patients to exchange information effortlessly, regardless of geographical barriers. This synergy empowers healthcare professionals to access patients' comprehensive medical histories in real time, facilitating more informed decision-making during virtual consultations. During the spring of 2020, when pandemic restrictions kept most people in the US at home, the use of telehealth rose to about 51%. [Source: Elation Health] Moreover, it enhances the accuracy of remote patient monitoring by providing up-to-date data, enabling timely interventions and improving overall healthcare outcomes. Integrating EHR telemedicine systems enhances efficiency and ensures that patient care remains at the forefront of modern healthcare, transcending traditional physical boundaries. 2. Technical Challenges and Solutions in EHR Integration Navigating telehealth EHR integration and remote patient monitoring solutions uncovers a range of technical challenges, each with its own set of potential remedies. These include interoperability issues, which can be mitigated by adopting standardized data formats like HL7 FHIR. EHR interoperability solutions may involve using data exchange protocols such as HL7's Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture (C-CDA) or developing custom APIs to facilitate seamless data exchange between EHRs and telemedicine platforms. Additionally, the imperative need for data security and privacy is achieved through robust encryption and adherence to regulations like HIPAA or GDPR. Data integration challenges arising from varying EHR data storage methods can be resolved using middleware or integration platforms. Investing in telecom infrastructure and developing offline-capable telemedicine apps can address limited connectivity in remote areas. Ensuring real-time data access involves optimizing EHR databases and creating low-latency systems. Other challenges encompass integrating data from medical devices, ensuring data accuracy, scalability, user-friendly interfaces, regulatory compliance, and cost management strategies. 3. Financial Analysis: Cost-Benefit Assessment of Integration When contemplating the integration of EHR telemedicine and remote patient monitoring systems, conducting a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis is crucial. This assessment covers financial aspects, including initial implementation costs (software development, hardware upgrades, training, and data migration), ongoing operational expenses (maintenance and data storage), and potential efficiency gains (streamlined workflows and improved data accessibility). It also evaluates the impact on patient outcomes, satisfaction, and financial benefits of enhanced healthcare quality, reduced readmissions, and increased patient engagement. Healthcare organizations can estimate cost savings in remote patient monitoring and explore expanding telemedicine services to underserved populations to make informed financial decisions. Additionally, this analysis considers long-term financial viability and alignment with organizational goals, including regulatory compliance costs, risk assessment, scalability considerations, and the competitive advantages of integrated telemedicine services. By calculating ROI and assessing potential risks, healthcare entities can develop risk mitigation strategies, ensuring that EHR integration in telemedicine and remote patient monitoring enhances healthcare delivery and aligns with the organization's financial sustainability and long-term success. 4. Data Privacy and Consent in Integrated EHR-Telemedicine Systems Data privacy and obtaining informed consent are paramount in integrated EHR and telemedicine systems. Patients should provide explicit consent, understanding the data collected and its intended use, with strict encryption protocols safeguarding data during transmission. Access controls and data minimization practices restrict unauthorized access, while patient portals enable individuals to manage their data-sharing preferences and revoke consent if needed. Compliance with regulations such as HIPAA or GDPR is crucial, as is maintaining comprehensive audit trails to track data access. Training, awareness, and robust incident response plans fortify data privacy efforts, fostering trust and transparency in these integrated systems where healthcare organizations and patients share responsibility for secure data handling. 5. Forging Stronger Patient-Clinician Relationships Integrating EHR telemedicine and remote monitoring systems goes beyond mere efficiency and accessibility objectives. It serves as a catalyst for nurturing more substantial and meaningful patient-clinician relationships. This fusion of technology and healthcare has the capacity to bridge physical distances, allowing clinicians to truly understand and engage with their patients on a deeper level. Patients, armed with increased access to their health data, become more active participants in their healthcare, while clinicians, with their comprehensive information, can offer more personalized and informed guidance. The potential of EHR telemedicine reaches far beyond the digital screen; it empowers both patients and clinicians to collaborate in pursuit of improved health outcomes, ushering in a new era of patient-centric care grounded in trust, communication, and shared knowledge.

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Unlocking the Puzzle: Navigating EHR Interoperability Solutions

Article | September 7, 2023

Unlock EHR interoperability solutions with this article. Discover how healthcare overcomes EHR interoperability challenges to facilitate seamless information sharing for better clinical decisions. 1. Exploring Hurdles in EHR Interoperability 2. Addressing EHR Interoperability Challenges: Mapping Effective Paths 2.1 Upgrading from Outdated Legacy Systems 2.2 Managing Inconsistent Information Across Multiple Sources 2.3 Overcoming Organizational Resistance to Sharing Data 2.4 Balancing Security and Consent 2.5 Harmonizing Data Standards Across Diverse Software Systems 2.6 Optimizing Training Resources for EHR Interoperability 2.7 Strategizing Costs for Specialist-driven Interoperability Management 2.8 Navigating Budget Constraints in EHR Interoperability 2.9 Unifying Patient Identification Standards Across HIEs 2.10 Advancing Allergy Management to Enhance Patient Care 3. Embracing Interoperability for a Connected Healthcare Future 1.Exploring Hurdles in EHR Interoperability Despite significant efforts and investments in health information systems and technology, coupled with many years of widespread availability, the full benefits of electronic health records (EHRs) still need to be realized. The reality is that most physicians continue to rely on faxing and mailing patient records, just as they did a decade ago. Numerous government-certified EHR products are being used, each utilizing distinct clinical terminologies, technical specifications, and functional capabilities. These differences make it challenging to establish a unified standard interoperability format for data sharing. Interestingly, even EHR systems built on the same platform might not be interoperable, as they are frequently highly customized to an organization’s specific workflow and preferences. Given these circumstances, the article examines ten challenges and their corresponding EHR interoperability solutions to enhance patient care. 2.Addressing EHR Interoperability Challenges: Mapping Effective Paths The primary goal of healthcare interoperability is to enable seamless sharing of health-related information between healthcare providers and patients, aiding in clinical decision-making. Here are several challenges to accomplishing this aim, along with their corresponding interoperability solutions: 2. 1 Upgrading from Outdated Legacy Systems One of the significant challenges in achieving EHR interoperability is the need to transition from outdated legacy systems. Many healthcare facilities still rely on older, proprietary EHR systems that need more compatibility and standards to communicate seamlessly with modern, interconnected healthcare networks. These legacy systems often need more data exchange capabilities, leading to inefficiencies, data inconsistencies, and barriers to collaborative patient care. The intricate process of upgrading or replacing these systems while ensuring data integrity and continuity of care poses a considerable obstacle to achieving comprehensive EHR interoperability. Healthcare institutions need to implement a strategic and phased approach to address this challenge. This involves assessing the existing EHR, identifying interoperability gaps, and selecting modern healthcare interoperability solutions that adhere to industry standards, such as Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (HL7 FHIR) and open APIs. A well-defined migration plan should be developed, including data migration, new system integration, and staff training. Collaboration with EHR vendors, IT experts, and clinical stakeholders is crucial to ensuring a smooth transition. 2.2 Managing Inconsistent Information Across Multiple Sources As patients move through different healthcare settings and encounter various medical professionals, their health information becomes distributed across multiple sources, leading to discrepancies, duplications, and variations in data. This inconsistency can compromise patient safety, treatment accuracy, and healthcare quality. Furthermore, different institutions' varying data formats, coding systems, and documentation practices exacerbate the challenge of creating a unified and accurate patient record. A potential solution to this challenge involves developing and adopting standardized data exchange protocols. By implementing common data standards and practices, healthcare providers can ensure that patient information is accurately represented and uniformly understood across different systems. In addition, robust data validation processes and reconciliation algorithms can help identify and rectify inconsistencies during data integration. Moreover, creating a centralized patient identity management system that links various patient records to a single, accurate identity can significantly mitigate the issue of duplicated or mismatched information. 2.3 Overcoming Organizational Resistance to Sharing Data This EHR interoperability challenge pertains to the reluctance of healthcare institutions, clinics, and providers to readily exchange patient information and medical records due to concerns over data privacy, competitive advantage, and operational complexities. This resistance often leads to fragmented patient care, hindered medical research, and compromised clinical decision-making. Addressing this challenge necessitates the establishment of clear data-sharing protocols, robust privacy safeguards, and incentivized collaboration. By fostering a culture of trust, emphasizing the collective benefits of data exchange, and implementing interoperability standards, the healthcare ecosystem can encourage reluctant organizations to actively share essential patient data, ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes and more efficient healthcare delivery. 2.4 Balancing Security and Consent This challenge in EHR interoperability revolves around the delicate equilibrium between ensuring patient data security and privacy while enabling the seamless sharing of EHRs across different healthcare systems. Striking the right balance involves addressing concerns about unauthorized access, data breaches, and patient consent preferences. While robust security measures are necessary to safeguard sensitive health information, overly stringent restrictions can hinder the efficient exchange of vital medical data, potentially impeding timely and informed patient care, medical research, and healthcare system efficiency. Potential EHR interoperability solutions to this challenge include implementing a layered security and consent management approach. This involves combining strong encryption, authentication protocols, and access controls to ensure the integrity and confidentiality of EHRs. Moreover, the adoption of standardized and granular consent mechanisms empowers patients to regulate both access to their data and the purposes for which it can be accessed. An integrated framework that employs advanced technologies like blockchain for secure audit trails and data-sharing logs can enhance transparency and accountability. Furthermore, patient education and awareness campaigns can empower individuals to make informed data-sharing decisions, fostering a collaborative environment where security, consent, and interoperability coexist harmoniously. 2.5 Harmonizing Data Standards Across Diverse Software Systems This challenge encompasses integrating and exchanging medical data across various software platforms and applications used within the healthcare industry. To tackle this challenge, a comprehensive solution includes the widespread adoption and adherence to standardized data formats, coding conventions, and communication protocols by developers, healthcare organizations, and EHR integration software. To address this challenge, a comprehensive solution involves the establishment of standardized data formats, coding conventions, and communication protocols widely adopted and adhered to by EHR software developers and healthcare organizations. This could be achieved through industry collaboration, government regulations, and incentives for adopting interoperability standards. Additionally, implementing APIs that translate and map data between different formats can help bridge the gap between diverse software systems. 2.6 Optimizing Training Resources for EHR Interoperability This hurdle involves preparing healthcare professionals, IT staff, and other stakeholders to effectively navigate and implement interoperable EHR systems. Ensuring that healthcare personnel possess the necessary skills and knowledge to seamlessly integrate, maintain, and utilize interconnected EHR systems amidst rapidly evolving technology and standards poses a significant hurdle. This challenge involves understanding the intricacies of interoperability protocols and grasping the broader context of data security, patient privacy, and efficient data exchange among diverse healthcare entities. To address this challenge, developing comprehensive and up-to-date training programs that cover both technical aspects (interoperability standards, APIs, and data formats) and practical considerations (security protocols, data governance) is crucial. Collaborations with vendors, industry experts, and academia can ensure the training content remains aligned and updated with current EHR trends. Integrating EHR interoperability education into medical and IT curricula can also lay a foundation for future professionals. Continuous learning opportunities, including EHR analytics courses, certifications, and knowledge-sharing platforms, can further bolster the continual development of skills and knowledge exchange. This process cultivates a skilled workforce capable of fully leveraging EHR interoperability while upholding the integrity and privacy of patient data. 2.7 Strategizing Costs for Specialist-driven Interoperability Management This challenge pertains to the complex and costly task of ensuring seamless data exchange among diverse EHR systems, mainly when managed by specialists with domain-specific knowledge. These specialists play a crucial role in tailoring EHR interoperability solutions to the unique needs of their medical domains. Still, the financial implications of such endeavors can be substantial, involving customization, integration, and maintenance expenses. Finding an effective solution requires a multi-faceted approach involving standardized interoperability frameworks, modular system design, strategic resource allocation, and collaborative partnerships among EHR vendors, healthcare institutions, and specialists. By optimizing the balance between customization and standardization and leveraging technological advances like APIs and cloud computing, healthcare ecosystems can mitigate costs while achieving efficient and secure data exchange that benefits patients and healthcare providers. 2.8 Navigating Budget Constraints in EHR Interoperability This issue relates to healthcare organizations' significant financial limitations when striving to establish seamless EHR data exchange across disparate systems. As healthcare entities aim to enhance patient care coordination and data accessibility, the cost of implementing and maintaining interoperable EHR systems becomes a substantial hurdle. This challenge necessitates a delicate balance between allocating resources for EHR integration, customization, and ongoing maintenance while ensuring that patient data remains secure and accessible to authorized stakeholders. A possible avenue to deal with the budget constraints in EHR interoperability is the strategic adoption of open-source frameworks. By leveraging open-source solutions, healthcare organizations can reduce licensing fees and development costs associated with proprietary systems, allowing them to allocate resources more efficiently. Additionally, collaborating with industry consortia and governmental initiatives that promote standardized data exchange protocols can foster economies of scale, streamlining the implementation process. Moreover, investing in cloud-based technologies can offer scalable and cost-effective data storage and sharing infrastructure. 2.9 Unifying Patient Identification Standards Across HIEs The crux of this issue involves the need for consistent patient identification methods across different healthcare systems and data-sharing networks. This inconsistency results in errors, data duplication, and compromised patient safety as information is exchanged between entities. Without a standardized patient identification system, accurate matching of patient records becomes a complex endeavor, hindering the seamless exchange of EHRs and undermining the potential benefits of interoperability. To address this challenge, a comprehensive solution involves establishing and adopting a universally recognized patient identification standard that spans all participating HIEs. This standard could include using unique patient identifiers or a combination of demographic, biometric, and cryptographic identifiers to ensure accurate and secure patient matching. Additionally, implementing advanced data governance practices, strong privacy protections, and robust data validation algorithms would enhance the accuracy and security of patient identification. Collaboration between healthcare organizations, government agencies, and technology experts is crucial to developing and implementing this standardized approach, fostering a more interconnected and effective healthcare ecosystem while safeguarding patient privacy and data integrity. 2.10 Advancing Allergy Management to Enhance Patient Care Healthcare providers need help seamlessly sharing allergy-related patient data across different EHR platforms, hindering comprehensive patient care. This lack of interoperability leads to fragmented information, potential medication errors, and compromised treatment decisions, ultimately impacting patient safety and outcomes. One viable solution for addressing this challenge is to establish standardized data exchange protocols alongside a unified health information exchange framework. Implementing FHIR standards can enable the consistent and secure sharing of allergy information among EHR systems. Additionally, incentivizing healthcare organizations to adopt these interoperability EHR standards and invest in compatible technologies will promote a cohesive ecosystem where allergy data can be accurately and swiftly exchanged. Collaborative efforts among EHR vendors, healthcare providers, and regulatory bodies are essential to ensure the seamless flow of allergy-related information, resulting in enhanced patient care, reduced medical errors, and improved healthcare efficiency. 3.Embracing Interoperability for a Connected Healthcare Future With the goal of a cohesive healthcare future in mind, the value of embracing interoperability is immeasurable. This article highlights the essential role of interoperability in overcoming the challenges posed by fragmented data and improving patient outcomes. As healthcare systems continue to develop, the smooth exchange of EHRs becomes crucial, fostering collaboration among diverse stakeholders and facilitating well-informed decision-making. By creating an environment in which EHRs can seamlessly communicate, healthcare providers have the potential to offer more comprehensive, patient-centered care, minimize duplication, and expedite both diagnoses and treatments. Although achieving an interoperable healthcare ecosystem may involve complexity, the benefits of efficiency, precision, and overall quality of care underscore its necessity as a transformative journey.

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MongoDB Launches New Initiatives to Accelerate Modern Application Development for Healthcare and Insurance Organizations

PR Newswire | October 06, 2023

MongoDB, Inc. at MongoDB.local Boston, announced the launch of MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance, two new initiatives that help companies in these industries accelerate their pace of innovation and better serve end-users with modern, data-driven applications. MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance include expert-led innovation workshops, tailored technology partnerships, and industry-specific knowledge accelerators to provide customized training paths designed for a range of use cases that developers in these industries work with. To learn more about MongoDB Atlas. "Organizations in the healthcare and insurance industries depend on large volumes of highly sensitive data to make critical decisions about patient care and coverage policies for customers. However, these industries face challenges not only from legacy applications that rely on siloed data, but also complex networks of providers and organizations. These constraints prevent them from realizing the full potential of their data," said Boris Bialek, Field CTO of Industry Solutions at MongoDB. "With the launch of MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance, we're alleviating these challenges by providing organizations with the tools required to build modern applications that increase operational efficiency and productivity. Deploying modern applications with MongoDB can help increase interoperability across entire enterprises that enable healthcare organizations to harness real-time patient insights and build personalized care pathways, and for insurers to capitalize on AI, machine learning, and advanced analytics to modernize their underwriting and claims processes." MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance include solutions and capabilities that can help organizations reimagine how they interact with end users by deploying data-driven applications with the flexibility, security, and resilience the healthcare and insurance industries require: Migrate and modernize legacy applications with minimal risk and zero downtime: For organizations in the healthcare and insurance industries that want to move from legacy relational databases to modern applications on MongoDB Atlas, MongoDB Relational Migrator reduces the time, cost, and risk typically associated with these projects–making it significantly faster and easier to optimize operations and accelerate innovation. MongoDB Relational Migrator analyzes legacy databases, automatically generates new data schema and code to operate migrated applications, and then executes a seamless migration to MongoDB Atlas with no downtime required. Organizations can run the migrated, modernized application in a testing environment before deploying to production to ensure it is optimized and performing as intended. MongoDB Relational Migrator provides companies in the healthcare and insurance industries with the flexibility to move to MongoDB Atlas quickly and efficiently, so they can focus on building and shipping world-class applications. Protect sensitive data throughout applications: With MongoDB Queryable Encryption, healthcare and insurance organizations can ensure full-lifecycle encryption of sensitive data—including patient records, medical histories, and insurance claims—not only in-transit over networks and at-rest during storage, but also while data is in use during querying. MongoDB Queryable Encryption provides state-of-the-art encryption that helps reduce data exfiltration and operational risk with an easy-to-use capability organizations can use to secure highly sensitive workloads with no cryptography expertise required. With MongoDB Queryable Encryption, developers in these industries working with highly sensitive information can protect their data throughout its entire lifecycle when being stored, queried, and processed on MongoDB. Run data-driven applications anywhere: MongoDB Atlas for the Edge enables organizations to deploy applications closer to where real-time data is generated, processed and stored, across mobile and IoT devices, on-premises servers, and multiple major cloud providers. For example, healthcare providers can seamlessly deploy applications across mobile devices and on-premises servers for interacting with patients and accessing medical records when internet connectivity is unavailable—while also ensuring data is synchronized with the cloud once connectivity is available. Insurance companies can also deploy applications across mobile devices for use cases that simplify underwriting, claims processing, and build new cross-industry products and services. MongoDB Atlas for the Edge enables organizations to build, deploy, and manage applications that are accessible virtually anywhere without the complexity typically associated with operating distributed applications at the edge. Reimagine possibilities with innovation workshops: Both MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance include dedicated executive engagement with industry experts from MongoDB and the MongoDB Partner Ecosystem to ideate client-specific solutions using best practices developed through proven industry experience. Healthcare and insurance innovation workshops are tailored to address the unique challenges and opportunities that these organizations face so they can modernize their operations with security and compliance in mind. Jumpstart application development: With MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance, organizations can engage with the MongoDB Professional Services team to take advantage of healthcare and insurance expertise and accelerate projects from concept to prototype to production in less time. Experts from the MongoDB Professional Services team can work backward from an organization's specific challenges to conduct architectural reviews, and help quickly prototype proofs of concept for ideation before moving new applications to production. Upskill teams to quickly build modern applications: MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance provide tailored MongoDB University courses and learning materials, including unlimited access to curated webinars and solutions sessions, to help developers learn how to quickly build modern applications for the healthcare and insurance fields. Organizations can benefit from training new and experienced developers from the ground up on how to build modern, data-driven applications to modernize operations and reimagine end user experiences. GE HealthCare is a leader in precision care, infusing innovation with patient-focused technologies to enable better care. "GE Healthcare turned to MongoDB to manage the lifecycle of our IoT devices, from deployment to retirement," said Emir Biser, Senior Data Architect at GE HealthCare. MongoDB Atlas is a gamechanger. This technology stack is helping us streamline commercialization and bring market-ready solutions to deliver advanced healthcare. Some of the recent tests resulted in an 83% decrease in retrieval time for critical data elements. [Source: PR Newswire] Inovaare Corporation is a leading provider of AI-powered compliance automation solutions for healthcare payers. "Recognizing the significance of compliance in today's healthcare environment, Inovaare sought a solution that could not only help navigate the intricacies of this domain but also bring forth profound industry expertise into the mix," said Mohar Mishra, CTO and Co-Founder at Inovaare Corporation. "MongoDB Atlas fortifies our data infrastructure and enables streamlined data processing for robust analytics and reporting capabilities. Additionally, we rely on MongoDB Atlas Vector Search to deliver context-aware compliance guidance and real-time data-driven insights. MongoDB has been instrumental in helping us consistently deliver state-of-the-art compliance solutions that empower healthcare payers." Redcliffe Labs is India's fastest-growing omnichannel diagnostics service provider focussing on providing quality-led conclusive diagnostics to Indian citizens. "We have been working constantly to improve customer experiences and convenience by embracing innovative technologies," said Prabhat Pankaj, Chief Technology Officer at Redcliffe Labs. "To achieve that goal, we have leveraged the adaptable document database model of MongoDB Atlas to power our Smart Health Report, a resource that summarizes a range of indicators and trackers along with health tips, and dietary recommendations to evaluate holistic health. We are confident that this partnership will enable us to provide our customers with effective services." Helvetia is one of the largest Swiss insurance companies, serving over 7 million personal and corporate customers across Europe. "Insurance policies are composed of many diverse attributes, while customer data is hierarchically structured. Trying to fit these flexible structures into rigid rows and columns of a relational database would add a lot of friction to our developers," said Daniel Maier, Lead Solution Architect at Helvetia. "MongoDB Atlas Search is blazing fast! We can surface relevant results from data sets with tens of millions of documents in around 15ms. Atlas Search has also given us a cleaner and simpler architecture. We can create new indexes in a single API call, and data is automatically synced between the database and search index, giving consistent, high quality query results. Developer and operational overhead is reduced, creating cost and time savings which we can reinvest back into building products for our customers." About MongoDB Atlas for Industries MongoDB for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance are both part of MongoDB Atlas for Industries, a program that helps organizations accelerate cloud adoption and modernization by leveraging industry-specific expertise, programs, partnerships, and integrated solutions. About MongoDB Atlas MongoDB Atlas is the leading multi-cloud developer data platform that accelerates and simplifies building applications with data. MongoDB Atlas provides an integrated set of data and application services in a unified environment that enables development teams to quickly build with the performance and scale modern applications require. Tens of thousands of customers and millions of developers worldwide rely on MongoDB Atlas every day to power their business-critical applications. About MongoDB Headquartered in New York, MongoDB's mission is to empower innovators to create, transform, and disrupt industries by unleashing the power of software and data. Built by developers, for developers, our developer data platform is a database with an integrated set of related services that allow development teams to address the growing requirements for today's wide variety of modern applications, all in a unified and consistent user experience. MongoDB has tens of thousands of customers in over 100 countries. The MongoDB database platform has been downloaded hundreds of millions of times since 2007, and there have been millions of builders trained through MongoDB University courses.

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

GE HealthCare and Novo Nordisk to Collaborate to Advance Novel Non-Invasive Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity with Ultrasound

Business Wire | October 20, 2023

GE HealthCare announced a collaboration with Novo Nordisk to further advance the clinical and product development of peripheral focused ultrasound (PFUS). This is a novel technology that has potential to specifically regulate metabolic function in the body using ultrasound that may support the treatment of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. PFUS is a non-invasive type of bioelectronic medicine that uses ultrasound to activate the nervous system to stimulate a response that may be able to treat disease. Pre-clinical proof of concept and initial early-stage clinical research suggests that it may impact glucose metabolism in people with diabetes via personalized ultrasound stimulation of nerve pathways. If validated with further clinical evidence, PFUS could represent a non-pharmacologic approach to normalize blood glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes. The existing technology was developed by a team of scientists at GE HealthCare’s HealthCare Technology and Innovation Center, formerly part of the GE Research Center. said Roland Rott, President and CEO, Ultrasound, GE HealthCare. In an era where diabetes is increasing around the globe, we are enthusiastic about the potential for ultrasound to help people live healthier lives, This collaboration with Novo Nordisk opens a path to evolve ultrasound from a means of screening and diagnosis into therapy, as well. We are eager to validate and further develop this potentially groundbreaking science, as we strive to offer patients alternative treatment options for chronic diseases. [Source – Business Wire] An estimated 540 million adults around the world have diabetes, with type 2 diabetes accounting for more than 90 percent of cases.1 An estimated one in eight individuals will have diabetes in 2045, with significant disease burden in low-and-middle-income countries.1 Given its impact on quality of life and mortality, and with its prevalence increasing at an alarming rate for the past three decades,2 type 2 diabetes is a significant public health burden. Obesity impacts approximately 1 billion people worldwide.3 “We look forward to exploring the potential impact this technology could have on treating people with type 2 diabetes and obesity, as significant unmet needs remain in these diseases in spite of recent advances in care,” said Martin Holst Lange, Executive Vice President and Head of Development at Novo Nordisk. “Although early, the possibilities of using ultrasound for therapeutic purposes are compelling and we welcome our collaboration with GE HealthCare in this truly novel area.” As part of the collaboration, GE HealthCare and Novo Nordisk will contribute their respective expertise in ultrasound medical technology and metabolic disease treatment and management as both parties work together to develop a PFUS solution to improve patient care, building upon the extensive foundational research done to date by the GE HealthCare team. Additional terms of the agreement were not disclosed. About GE HealthCare Technologies Inc. GE HealthCare is a leading global medical technology, pharmaceutical diagnostics, and digital solutions innovator, dedicated to providing integrated solutions, services, and data analytics to make hospitals more efficient, clinicians more effective, therapies more precise, and patients healthier and happier. Serving patients and providers for more than 100 years, GE HealthCare is advancing personalized, connected, and compassionate care, while simplifying the patient’s journey across the care pathway. Together our Imaging, Ultrasound, Patient Care Solutions, and Pharmaceutical Diagnostics businesses help improve patient care from diagnosis, to therapy, to monitoring. We are an $18.3 billion business with 50,000 employees working to create a world where healthcare has no limits.

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

Launch of RICOH Remote Patient Monitoring Enablement Designed to Help Ease Healthcare Staffing Challenges Amid Unprecedented Industry Burnout Crisis

PR Newswire | October 06, 2023

Ricoh USA, Inc. announces the launch of RICOH Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) Enablement, the newest end-to-end managed services offering for health systems that is designed to help fuel more efficient and sustainable RPM workflows that can lead to improved patient and care delivery team experiences. RICOH RPM Enablement comes at a time when health systems are grappling with a simultaneous monumental shift to virtual care delivery and an unprecedented shortage of healthcare workers. This care worker shortage has reached a nationwide crisis level where there aren't nearly enough healthcare staff to fill vital RPM management roles, leading to alarming care gaps impacting the most vulnerable patient populations. RICOH RPM Enablement is designed to help health systems close this gap and to help lead to improved patient experiences by integrating into existing virtual care programs to support the deployment of remote patient monitoring system devices, inventory tracking, logistics, and device returns. The healthcare worker burnout and staffing shortage – most recently worsened by COVID – is putting extraordinary constraints on health systems to staff RPM management roles, which limits their ability to scale virtual programs and impacts the standard of patient care. According to the Surgeon General, 98% of healthcare workers worry about their own burnout1, which is likely accelerating nurse retirement, fueling a shortfall of 1.1 million registered nurses1. The Mayo Clinic's research has also revealed that U.S. doctor burnout has reached an all-time high of 63%2. Additionally, 98% of clinicians are concerned that burnout can reduce quality of care and 82% of the public believes that a worker shortage will impact their health3. Technology can be the difference maker in systemic change – and clinicians agree as 50-70% welcome the change to use technologies in their work4. "Clinicians currently spend over 50% of their working hours using EHRs5. That's their reality and a massive contributor to burnout, so our mission is centered on pivoting that time back to patient care through supporting the modernization, automation, and enablement of the care workflows that are most critical to health system's success," said Rory Fitzpatrick, Vice President, Industry Vertical Marketing, Ricoh North America. RPM Enablement is the latest demonstration of our commitment. In this period of burnout crisis, the healthcare industry has an opportunity to commit to workers' emotional and physical wellbeing – and Ricoh is dedicated to supporting positive systemic change with sustainable, scalable solutions. [Source: PR Newswire] RPM is often considered one of the largest value drivers of virtual care with applications from primary care through chronic disease management. In fact, when RPM is part of a care plan, the Mayo Clinic has shown that 72.5% of remote patient monitoring patients comply with the care plan's tasks, including taking medications and monitoring vitals6. Further, only 9.4% were readmitted within 30 days versus 20% of patients not using RPM6. Ricoh is uniquely positioned to help address workflow challenges resulting from the qualified healthcare worker shortage due to its large footprint and depth of managed services experience in the industry. Ricoh currently supports thousands of healthcare organizations with various aspects of their business, including 9 out of 11 of the largest for-profit hospital systems and 22 out of 32 of the largest nonprofit hospital systems, with about 3,200 facilities under its support – and is also responsible for managing over 1 million devices in the United States through more than 2,100 U.S. field technicians across various industries.

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

MongoDB Launches New Initiatives to Accelerate Modern Application Development for Healthcare and Insurance Organizations

PR Newswire | October 06, 2023

MongoDB, Inc. at MongoDB.local Boston, announced the launch of MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance, two new initiatives that help companies in these industries accelerate their pace of innovation and better serve end-users with modern, data-driven applications. MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance include expert-led innovation workshops, tailored technology partnerships, and industry-specific knowledge accelerators to provide customized training paths designed for a range of use cases that developers in these industries work with. To learn more about MongoDB Atlas. "Organizations in the healthcare and insurance industries depend on large volumes of highly sensitive data to make critical decisions about patient care and coverage policies for customers. However, these industries face challenges not only from legacy applications that rely on siloed data, but also complex networks of providers and organizations. These constraints prevent them from realizing the full potential of their data," said Boris Bialek, Field CTO of Industry Solutions at MongoDB. "With the launch of MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance, we're alleviating these challenges by providing organizations with the tools required to build modern applications that increase operational efficiency and productivity. Deploying modern applications with MongoDB can help increase interoperability across entire enterprises that enable healthcare organizations to harness real-time patient insights and build personalized care pathways, and for insurers to capitalize on AI, machine learning, and advanced analytics to modernize their underwriting and claims processes." MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance include solutions and capabilities that can help organizations reimagine how they interact with end users by deploying data-driven applications with the flexibility, security, and resilience the healthcare and insurance industries require: Migrate and modernize legacy applications with minimal risk and zero downtime: For organizations in the healthcare and insurance industries that want to move from legacy relational databases to modern applications on MongoDB Atlas, MongoDB Relational Migrator reduces the time, cost, and risk typically associated with these projects–making it significantly faster and easier to optimize operations and accelerate innovation. MongoDB Relational Migrator analyzes legacy databases, automatically generates new data schema and code to operate migrated applications, and then executes a seamless migration to MongoDB Atlas with no downtime required. Organizations can run the migrated, modernized application in a testing environment before deploying to production to ensure it is optimized and performing as intended. MongoDB Relational Migrator provides companies in the healthcare and insurance industries with the flexibility to move to MongoDB Atlas quickly and efficiently, so they can focus on building and shipping world-class applications. Protect sensitive data throughout applications: With MongoDB Queryable Encryption, healthcare and insurance organizations can ensure full-lifecycle encryption of sensitive data—including patient records, medical histories, and insurance claims—not only in-transit over networks and at-rest during storage, but also while data is in use during querying. MongoDB Queryable Encryption provides state-of-the-art encryption that helps reduce data exfiltration and operational risk with an easy-to-use capability organizations can use to secure highly sensitive workloads with no cryptography expertise required. With MongoDB Queryable Encryption, developers in these industries working with highly sensitive information can protect their data throughout its entire lifecycle when being stored, queried, and processed on MongoDB. Run data-driven applications anywhere: MongoDB Atlas for the Edge enables organizations to deploy applications closer to where real-time data is generated, processed and stored, across mobile and IoT devices, on-premises servers, and multiple major cloud providers. For example, healthcare providers can seamlessly deploy applications across mobile devices and on-premises servers for interacting with patients and accessing medical records when internet connectivity is unavailable—while also ensuring data is synchronized with the cloud once connectivity is available. Insurance companies can also deploy applications across mobile devices for use cases that simplify underwriting, claims processing, and build new cross-industry products and services. MongoDB Atlas for the Edge enables organizations to build, deploy, and manage applications that are accessible virtually anywhere without the complexity typically associated with operating distributed applications at the edge. Reimagine possibilities with innovation workshops: Both MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance include dedicated executive engagement with industry experts from MongoDB and the MongoDB Partner Ecosystem to ideate client-specific solutions using best practices developed through proven industry experience. Healthcare and insurance innovation workshops are tailored to address the unique challenges and opportunities that these organizations face so they can modernize their operations with security and compliance in mind. Jumpstart application development: With MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance, organizations can engage with the MongoDB Professional Services team to take advantage of healthcare and insurance expertise and accelerate projects from concept to prototype to production in less time. Experts from the MongoDB Professional Services team can work backward from an organization's specific challenges to conduct architectural reviews, and help quickly prototype proofs of concept for ideation before moving new applications to production. Upskill teams to quickly build modern applications: MongoDB Atlas for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance provide tailored MongoDB University courses and learning materials, including unlimited access to curated webinars and solutions sessions, to help developers learn how to quickly build modern applications for the healthcare and insurance fields. Organizations can benefit from training new and experienced developers from the ground up on how to build modern, data-driven applications to modernize operations and reimagine end user experiences. GE HealthCare is a leader in precision care, infusing innovation with patient-focused technologies to enable better care. "GE Healthcare turned to MongoDB to manage the lifecycle of our IoT devices, from deployment to retirement," said Emir Biser, Senior Data Architect at GE HealthCare. MongoDB Atlas is a gamechanger. This technology stack is helping us streamline commercialization and bring market-ready solutions to deliver advanced healthcare. Some of the recent tests resulted in an 83% decrease in retrieval time for critical data elements. [Source: PR Newswire] Inovaare Corporation is a leading provider of AI-powered compliance automation solutions for healthcare payers. "Recognizing the significance of compliance in today's healthcare environment, Inovaare sought a solution that could not only help navigate the intricacies of this domain but also bring forth profound industry expertise into the mix," said Mohar Mishra, CTO and Co-Founder at Inovaare Corporation. "MongoDB Atlas fortifies our data infrastructure and enables streamlined data processing for robust analytics and reporting capabilities. Additionally, we rely on MongoDB Atlas Vector Search to deliver context-aware compliance guidance and real-time data-driven insights. MongoDB has been instrumental in helping us consistently deliver state-of-the-art compliance solutions that empower healthcare payers." Redcliffe Labs is India's fastest-growing omnichannel diagnostics service provider focussing on providing quality-led conclusive diagnostics to Indian citizens. "We have been working constantly to improve customer experiences and convenience by embracing innovative technologies," said Prabhat Pankaj, Chief Technology Officer at Redcliffe Labs. "To achieve that goal, we have leveraged the adaptable document database model of MongoDB Atlas to power our Smart Health Report, a resource that summarizes a range of indicators and trackers along with health tips, and dietary recommendations to evaluate holistic health. We are confident that this partnership will enable us to provide our customers with effective services." Helvetia is one of the largest Swiss insurance companies, serving over 7 million personal and corporate customers across Europe. "Insurance policies are composed of many diverse attributes, while customer data is hierarchically structured. Trying to fit these flexible structures into rigid rows and columns of a relational database would add a lot of friction to our developers," said Daniel Maier, Lead Solution Architect at Helvetia. "MongoDB Atlas Search is blazing fast! We can surface relevant results from data sets with tens of millions of documents in around 15ms. Atlas Search has also given us a cleaner and simpler architecture. We can create new indexes in a single API call, and data is automatically synced between the database and search index, giving consistent, high quality query results. Developer and operational overhead is reduced, creating cost and time savings which we can reinvest back into building products for our customers." About MongoDB Atlas for Industries MongoDB for Healthcare and MongoDB Atlas for Insurance are both part of MongoDB Atlas for Industries, a program that helps organizations accelerate cloud adoption and modernization by leveraging industry-specific expertise, programs, partnerships, and integrated solutions. About MongoDB Atlas MongoDB Atlas is the leading multi-cloud developer data platform that accelerates and simplifies building applications with data. MongoDB Atlas provides an integrated set of data and application services in a unified environment that enables development teams to quickly build with the performance and scale modern applications require. Tens of thousands of customers and millions of developers worldwide rely on MongoDB Atlas every day to power their business-critical applications. About MongoDB Headquartered in New York, MongoDB's mission is to empower innovators to create, transform, and disrupt industries by unleashing the power of software and data. Built by developers, for developers, our developer data platform is a database with an integrated set of related services that allow development teams to address the growing requirements for today's wide variety of modern applications, all in a unified and consistent user experience. MongoDB has tens of thousands of customers in over 100 countries. The MongoDB database platform has been downloaded hundreds of millions of times since 2007, and there have been millions of builders trained through MongoDB University courses.

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

GE HealthCare and Novo Nordisk to Collaborate to Advance Novel Non-Invasive Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity with Ultrasound

Business Wire | October 20, 2023

GE HealthCare announced a collaboration with Novo Nordisk to further advance the clinical and product development of peripheral focused ultrasound (PFUS). This is a novel technology that has potential to specifically regulate metabolic function in the body using ultrasound that may support the treatment of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. PFUS is a non-invasive type of bioelectronic medicine that uses ultrasound to activate the nervous system to stimulate a response that may be able to treat disease. Pre-clinical proof of concept and initial early-stage clinical research suggests that it may impact glucose metabolism in people with diabetes via personalized ultrasound stimulation of nerve pathways. If validated with further clinical evidence, PFUS could represent a non-pharmacologic approach to normalize blood glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes. The existing technology was developed by a team of scientists at GE HealthCare’s HealthCare Technology and Innovation Center, formerly part of the GE Research Center. said Roland Rott, President and CEO, Ultrasound, GE HealthCare. In an era where diabetes is increasing around the globe, we are enthusiastic about the potential for ultrasound to help people live healthier lives, This collaboration with Novo Nordisk opens a path to evolve ultrasound from a means of screening and diagnosis into therapy, as well. We are eager to validate and further develop this potentially groundbreaking science, as we strive to offer patients alternative treatment options for chronic diseases. [Source – Business Wire] An estimated 540 million adults around the world have diabetes, with type 2 diabetes accounting for more than 90 percent of cases.1 An estimated one in eight individuals will have diabetes in 2045, with significant disease burden in low-and-middle-income countries.1 Given its impact on quality of life and mortality, and with its prevalence increasing at an alarming rate for the past three decades,2 type 2 diabetes is a significant public health burden. Obesity impacts approximately 1 billion people worldwide.3 “We look forward to exploring the potential impact this technology could have on treating people with type 2 diabetes and obesity, as significant unmet needs remain in these diseases in spite of recent advances in care,” said Martin Holst Lange, Executive Vice President and Head of Development at Novo Nordisk. “Although early, the possibilities of using ultrasound for therapeutic purposes are compelling and we welcome our collaboration with GE HealthCare in this truly novel area.” As part of the collaboration, GE HealthCare and Novo Nordisk will contribute their respective expertise in ultrasound medical technology and metabolic disease treatment and management as both parties work together to develop a PFUS solution to improve patient care, building upon the extensive foundational research done to date by the GE HealthCare team. Additional terms of the agreement were not disclosed. About GE HealthCare Technologies Inc. GE HealthCare is a leading global medical technology, pharmaceutical diagnostics, and digital solutions innovator, dedicated to providing integrated solutions, services, and data analytics to make hospitals more efficient, clinicians more effective, therapies more precise, and patients healthier and happier. Serving patients and providers for more than 100 years, GE HealthCare is advancing personalized, connected, and compassionate care, while simplifying the patient’s journey across the care pathway. Together our Imaging, Ultrasound, Patient Care Solutions, and Pharmaceutical Diagnostics businesses help improve patient care from diagnosis, to therapy, to monitoring. We are an $18.3 billion business with 50,000 employees working to create a world where healthcare has no limits.

Read More

Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

Launch of RICOH Remote Patient Monitoring Enablement Designed to Help Ease Healthcare Staffing Challenges Amid Unprecedented Industry Burnout Crisis

PR Newswire | October 06, 2023

Ricoh USA, Inc. announces the launch of RICOH Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) Enablement, the newest end-to-end managed services offering for health systems that is designed to help fuel more efficient and sustainable RPM workflows that can lead to improved patient and care delivery team experiences. RICOH RPM Enablement comes at a time when health systems are grappling with a simultaneous monumental shift to virtual care delivery and an unprecedented shortage of healthcare workers. This care worker shortage has reached a nationwide crisis level where there aren't nearly enough healthcare staff to fill vital RPM management roles, leading to alarming care gaps impacting the most vulnerable patient populations. RICOH RPM Enablement is designed to help health systems close this gap and to help lead to improved patient experiences by integrating into existing virtual care programs to support the deployment of remote patient monitoring system devices, inventory tracking, logistics, and device returns. The healthcare worker burnout and staffing shortage – most recently worsened by COVID – is putting extraordinary constraints on health systems to staff RPM management roles, which limits their ability to scale virtual programs and impacts the standard of patient care. According to the Surgeon General, 98% of healthcare workers worry about their own burnout1, which is likely accelerating nurse retirement, fueling a shortfall of 1.1 million registered nurses1. The Mayo Clinic's research has also revealed that U.S. doctor burnout has reached an all-time high of 63%2. Additionally, 98% of clinicians are concerned that burnout can reduce quality of care and 82% of the public believes that a worker shortage will impact their health3. Technology can be the difference maker in systemic change – and clinicians agree as 50-70% welcome the change to use technologies in their work4. "Clinicians currently spend over 50% of their working hours using EHRs5. That's their reality and a massive contributor to burnout, so our mission is centered on pivoting that time back to patient care through supporting the modernization, automation, and enablement of the care workflows that are most critical to health system's success," said Rory Fitzpatrick, Vice President, Industry Vertical Marketing, Ricoh North America. RPM Enablement is the latest demonstration of our commitment. In this period of burnout crisis, the healthcare industry has an opportunity to commit to workers' emotional and physical wellbeing – and Ricoh is dedicated to supporting positive systemic change with sustainable, scalable solutions. [Source: PR Newswire] RPM is often considered one of the largest value drivers of virtual care with applications from primary care through chronic disease management. In fact, when RPM is part of a care plan, the Mayo Clinic has shown that 72.5% of remote patient monitoring patients comply with the care plan's tasks, including taking medications and monitoring vitals6. Further, only 9.4% were readmitted within 30 days versus 20% of patients not using RPM6. Ricoh is uniquely positioned to help address workflow challenges resulting from the qualified healthcare worker shortage due to its large footprint and depth of managed services experience in the industry. Ricoh currently supports thousands of healthcare organizations with various aspects of their business, including 9 out of 11 of the largest for-profit hospital systems and 22 out of 32 of the largest nonprofit hospital systems, with about 3,200 facilities under its support – and is also responsible for managing over 1 million devices in the United States through more than 2,100 U.S. field technicians across various industries.

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