Study reveals how general anesthetics affect the brain

| April 24, 2019

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New research reveals for the first time that diverse drugs that induce general anesthesia activate a brain circuit that brings on sleep. The scientists at Duke University in Durham, NC who carried out the study, suggest that the findings will help to develop better drugs that can induce sleep with fewer adverse reactions.

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Oppioo

Oppioo is a patient-centered product that supports patients to plan and execute physical activity in conjunction with the treatment plan. Oppioo predicts what activity gives optimal effect and when during the cancer treatment based on patient data and the patient’s energy level. To do so, Oppioo collects activity data from the user’s smartphone and user feedback to create a personalized automated coaching plan with the help of AI models. Oppioo allows for sharing data with health care providers.

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Digital Health Democratizes Precision Medicine to Improve Population Health

Article | February 10, 2020

By definition, precision medicine treats the individual while public health focuses on population-level interventions. While public health and precision medicine efforts overlap, some experts argue that precision medicine advancements fall short of public health goals due to their underemphasis on scalability and accessibility. Digital health can help reconcile this conflict by promoting precision medicine’s goal of delivering the right treatment to the right patient at the right time while improving health equity through scalable, accessible solutions.

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2 REASONS WHY THE HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY NEEDS SECURITY OPERATION CENTERS

Article | February 10, 2020

This, unfortunately, is a very real cyber threat that healthcare organizations face every single day, and most of them are not prepared for it. According to a recent report by HIMSS, significant security incidents are a near-universal experience in US healthcare organizations. Most incidents are initiated by bad actors, leveraging e-mail as a means to compromise the integrity of their targets. Yes, they might be on a protected network, but the endpoint devices themselves aren’t protected as well as they could be. Combine an unprotected medical device with staff that hasn’t had any cyber training creates a huge insider threat, whether the staff does anything unwittingly or maliciously.

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Telehealth emerges as access tool in healthcare transformation

Article | February 10, 2020

Healthcare organizations are faced with addressing the “triple aim” of improving cost, quality and access to medical care. Telehealth has been seen as a tool to improve access with its convenience and availability with mobile apps or personal computers. Regulators are seeing the value of the technology with states loosening rules about the practice of telehealth and reimbursement improving, the American Telemedicine Association said. However, it will take some time for telehealth to reach its full potential to blend telehealth into current care processes. Right now, telehealth is separate from many of the healthcare workflows, which is keeping the technology from reaching its fullest potential – in terms of quality and patient experience. This can be overcome by addressing the economics, whether that is in health plan design and also how providers are compensated. Despite recent improvements in telehealth reimbursements, many of the payments are tied to in-person visits. Healthcare providers, payers and regulators need to figure out what treatments need to be reimbursed. Telemedicine, which involves clinician-to-clinician remote consults, is immensely important in emergency care and has shown a great deal of use in treating stroke, since not every facility has neurology covered around the clock. Certain medical specialties, such as psychiatry or dermatology, have a real opportunity to capitalize upon telehealth, as well as non-emergency, urgent care.

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Embracing healthcare’s digital transformation 2.0

Article | February 10, 2020

Technology is only as useful as the value it helps us deliver. For us to get to the next phase of this evolution, technology must fit into a patient-centric care model. When I shifted my role from a full-time practicing physician to a healthcare administrator 20 years ago, there were no national standards on quality measurements, let alone for performance-based payment or value-based payment models. Today, value-based initiatives are shifting care delivery from compensating volume to compensating value and redefining financial incentives toward better patient outcomes. In this model, providers must think about the entire patient experience across all care settings and between episodic visits. On top of this, consumer behavior is changing the way patients choose and receive care. Patients are increasingly embracing convenient options for their healthcare that match their lifestyle, but still want the peace of mind that comes with support from a consistent primary care provider or care team.

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Spotlight

Oppioo

Oppioo is a patient-centered product that supports patients to plan and execute physical activity in conjunction with the treatment plan. Oppioo predicts what activity gives optimal effect and when during the cancer treatment based on patient data and the patient’s energy level. To do so, Oppioo collects activity data from the user’s smartphone and user feedback to create a personalized automated coaching plan with the help of AI models. Oppioo allows for sharing data with health care providers.

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