Plugging Cell Biology Into a Genomic World

| January 15, 2014

article image
Personalized oncology epitomizes the concept of interdisciplinary research where pathologists, bioinformaticians, oncologists, and biologists work together to identify and ultimately target drivers of cancer. We gather at tables to collaborate across disciplines and try to speak the same language with the goals of advancing knowledge and helping patients. As a cancer cell biologist at the Winship Cancer Institute, I have been privileged to be a part of these conversations and to contribute to our efforts to understand tumor biology.

Spotlight

SE Health

SE Health (Saint Elizabeth Health Care) is a social enterprise applying knowledge, vision and drive to forever impact how people live and age at home, today and into the future. With Canadian roots and 110 years of expertise, the not-for-profit organization brings quality excellence and innovation to home care, seniors lifestyle and family caregiving. Through its team of 9,000 Leaders of Impact, SE Health delivers 20,000 care exchanges daily, totaling 50 million in the last decade alone.

OTHER ARTICLES

A snapshot of the precision medicine landscape

Article | March 4, 2020

The global market for precision medicine is projected to top more than $84.5 billion by 2024. Targeted therapies for rare, genetic diseases, cancer and chronic conditions come with the hope of a cure. Companies such as Roche, Novartis, Spark Therapeutics, Pfizer, Editas and BioMarin are among the pharma players in this space. There seem to be new developments in precision medicine on almost a weekly basis. So what do educational institutions need to do to create fertile ground for gene therapy research to produce the next generation of companies developing these therapies? And what needs to happen to facilitate data sharing, ensure access to genome sequencing and these promising therapies?

Read More

Can New Technology Drive Health Care’s Future?

Article | April 11, 2020

Over the past twenty-five years most businesses have been revolutionized by the easy availability of cloud and mobile-based computing systems. These technologies have placed power and access into the hands of employees and customers, which in turn has created huge shifts in how transactions get done. Now the companies with the highest market value are both the drivers of and beneficiaries of this transition, notably Apple, Facebook, Amazon and Alphabet (Google), as well as their international rivals like Samsung, Baidu, Tencent and Alibaba. Everyone uses their products every day, and the impact on our lives have been remarkable. Of course, this also impacts how businesses of all types are organized. Underpinning this transformation has been a change from enterprise-specific software to generic cloud-based services—sometimes called SMAC (Social/Sensors/Mobile/Analytics/Cloud). Applications such as data storage, sales management, email and the hardware they ran on were put into enterprises during the 80s and 90s in the client-server era (dominated by Intel and Microsoft). These have now migrated to cloud-based, on-demand services.

Read More

2 REASONS WHY THE HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY NEEDS SECURITY OPERATION CENTERS

Article | March 14, 2020

This, unfortunately, is a very real cyber threat that healthcare organizations face every single day, and most of them are not prepared for it. According to a recent report by HIMSS, significant security incidents are a near-universal experience in US healthcare organizations. Most incidents are initiated by bad actors, leveraging e-mail as a means to compromise the integrity of their targets. Yes, they might be on a protected network, but the endpoint devices themselves aren’t protected as well as they could be. Combine an unprotected medical device with staff that hasn’t had any cyber training creates a huge insider threat, whether the staff does anything unwittingly or maliciously.

Read More

Identity + RBAC Tighten Security in Healthcare

Article | March 6, 2020

As worries about coronavirus (also known as COVID-19) mount daily, healthcare and health care organizations work valiantly to deliver quality healthcare. Potential exposure of health care workers to COVID-19 risks further shortages of hospital staff and clinical service providers. This presents a security challenge in rapidly authorizing individuals to fill needed roles as they are temporarily vacated. Role-based access control (RBAC) has long been the standard many organizations adhere to when establishing security and limiting access to resources. In a rapidly changing environment RBAC alone falls short of meeting data privacy and security needs. Implementation of role-based access controls (RBAC) alone no longer aligns with the needs of modern healthcare or the incorporation of cloud software and ecosystems. RBAC indicates the use of static roles and groups to restrict access to sensitive data and critical systems with a set it and forget it mindset. In the past RBAC alone was sufficient, but cloud migration strategies and a fluid workforce require time-bound access to maintain proper governance. Healthcare organizations have a dynamic structure and must accommodate individuals working in varying shifts, multiple clinics, or research areas, which requires shifting permissions depending on their duties at a given time. RBAC alone simply cannot keep pace with modern healthcare security needs.

Read More

Spotlight

SE Health

SE Health (Saint Elizabeth Health Care) is a social enterprise applying knowledge, vision and drive to forever impact how people live and age at home, today and into the future. With Canadian roots and 110 years of expertise, the not-for-profit organization brings quality excellence and innovation to home care, seniors lifestyle and family caregiving. Through its team of 9,000 Leaders of Impact, SE Health delivers 20,000 care exchanges daily, totaling 50 million in the last decade alone.

Events