Mark Murcko lectures on drug discovery in pharmaceutical industry

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Mark Murcko, one of the founders of Vertex Pharmaceuticals, gives a public lecture at the College of the Holy Cross on "The Quest for Health: Hunting for Drugs in Large Pharmas and Tiny Biotechs," November 13, 2013. In his talk, Murcko lays out the drawbacks and benefits of working in the drug discovery field. He talks about the types of behaviors and work cultures that yield the most success, and debunks a number of misconceptions about the pharmaceutical industry. Murcko served two decades as Chief Technology Officer and Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of Vertex. He directly contributed to the development of four marketed drugs, treating glaucoma, HIV and HCV. He holds more than 40 patents and 85 scientific publications. He sits on a number of Boards of Directors and Scientific Advisory Boards and serves as visiting professor to both MIT and Northeastern University.

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HEALTHCARE ANALYTICS

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Article | April 2, 2020

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Spotlight

Chilton Medical Center

Chilton Medical Center is committed to providing innovative patient care in a compassionate and healing environment focused on personalized care. Chilton Medical Center is a part of Atlantic Health System, one of the largest not-for-profit health care systems in New Jersey. It owns and operates Morristown, Overlook, and Newton Medical Centers and the Goryeb Children’s Hospital in Morristown...

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