Ken Burns Uncovers the Catholic Roots of a Healthcare Giant in The Mayo Clinic

Currently airing on Netflix after a run on PBS last September, acclaimed documentarian Ken Burns’ latest effort, The Mayo Clinic: Faith Hope Science, explores the history of the famed Minnesota hospital and medical-research facility and finds some determined Franciscan nuns.For centuries, and to this day, the Catholic Church has provided healthcare around the world, often for the most underserved and impoverished communities, and remains today the largest non-government provider of healthcare in the world.

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SoutheastHEALTH is a far-reaching network of providers and facilities including Southeast Hospital in Cape Girardeau, Mo., which provides a regional system of healthcare services throughout a multi-state region.

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

4 trends that are shaping product management in health care

Article | August 16, 2023

“Health care is different, the data here is emotional! If you tell me you were buying a fishing rod online and were emotional about it, I’d say you are lying. But I do frequently see people helpless and confused when it comes to receiving health care, managing its costs, making sense of its data.”  - Senior Product Leader inOptum Global Solutions Pvt. Ltd. Yes, health care is different, and so is product management in it. This piece highlights the top 4 product management trends that are specific to health care and serve beyond being just a list of technologies making their way into health care. Health care consumerism Lance broke his ankle in a bicycle accident and is now in hospital waiting for surgery. Which of these words would describe him more aptly— a ‘patient’ or a ‘health care consumer’? The fact that Lance holds a high-deductible health plan, manages an interactive relationship with his primary doctor, keenly monitors his fitness through his smartwatch, and learns about healthier diet plans and recipes online — I can say he isn’t just receiving health care, but making active choices on how to pay for and manage his health. This choice and responsibility that people demand, is ‘health care consumerism’. This trend has been growing since 2015 when value-based care started picking up in the US. What does this imply for products/PMs? These are challenging and exciting times to be a product manager (PM) in health tech. This is because people are now demanding an experience equivalent to what they’re used to from other products in their lives, such as e-commerce, streaming platforms, and digital payments, to name a few. Any consumer-facing product (a mobile app, a web-based patient portal, a tech-enabled service) needs to meet high expectations. Flexible employer-sponsored health plans options, health reimbursement arrangements, price transparency products for drugs and medical expenses, remote health care services, and government's push to strengthen data and privacy rights — all point to opportunities for building innovative products with ‘health care consumerism’ as a key product philosophy. Wellness COVID-19 has tested health care systems to their limits. In most countries, these systems failed disastrously in providing adequate, timely medical assistance to many infected people. Prevention is of course better than cure, but people were now forced to learn it the hard way when cure became both inaccessible and uncertain. With lockdowns and social isolation, prevention, fitness, diet, and mental wellbeing all took center stage. Wellness means taking a ‘whole-person approach’ to health care — one where people recognize the need to improve and sustain health, not only when they are unwell, but also when they’re making health care decisions that concern their long-term physical and mental health. A McKinsey study notes that consumers look at wellness from 6 dimensions beyond sick-care— health, fitness, nutrition, appearance, sleep, and mindfulness. Most countries in the study show that wellness has gained priority by at least 35% in the last 2–3 years. And wellness services like nutritionists, care managers, fitness training, psychotherapy consultants contribute 30% of the overall wellness spend. So, what do health-tech PMs need to remember about wellness? The first principle is, “Move to care out of the hospital, and into people’s homes”. A patient discharged after knee surgery has high chance of getting readmitted if he/she has high risk of falling in his/her house, or is unable to afford post-discharge at-home care with a physiotherapist. This leads us PMs to build products that recognize every person’s social determinants of health and create support systems that consider care at the hospital and care at home as a continuum. The second principle is, “Don’t be limited by a narrow view of ‘what business we are in’, as wellness is broad, and as a health tech company, we are in health-care, not sick-care”. Wellness products and services include — fitness and nutrition apps, medical devices, telemedicine, sleep trackers, wellness-oriented apparel, beauty products, and meditation-oriented offerings, to name just a few. Recent regulations in many countries require health care providers to treat behavioural health services at par with treating for physical conditions, and this is just a start. Equitable AI Last month, WHO released a report titled “Ethics and Governance of Artificial Intelligence for Health”. The report cautions researchers and health tech companies to never design AI algorithms with a single population in mind. One example I read was, “AI systems that are primarily trained on data collected from patients in high-income settings will not perform as effectively for individuals in low or middle-income communities.” During COVID-19, we came across countless studies that talked about the disproportionate impact on minorities in terms of infections, hospitalizations, and mortality. A student at MIT discovered that a popular out-of-the-box AI algorithm that projects patient mortality for those admitted in hospitals, makes significantly different predictions based on race — and this may have adversely moved hospital resources away from some patients who had higher risks of mortality. How should I think about health equity as an AI health-tech PM? Health equity means that everyone should have a fair chance at being healthy. As a PM, it’s my job to make sure that every AI-assisted feature in my product is crafted to be re-iterative and inclusive, to serve any community or subpopulation, and is validated across many geographies. To prevent any inequitable AI from getting shipped, it is important to ensure that the underlying AI model is transparent and intelligible. This means knowing what data goes into it, how it learns, which features does it weigh over others, and how does the model handles unique features that characterize minorities. Integrated and interoperable In every article that I read on topics such as digital platforms, SaaS, or connectivity with EMRs, I always find the words: ‘integrated’ and ‘interoperable’ therein. Most large and conventional health tech companies started by offering point-solutions that were often inextensible, monolithic, and worked with isolated on-prem servers and databases. To give a consistent user experience, leverage economies of scope, and scale products to meet other needs of their customers, started an exodus from fragmented point-solutions to interoperable, integrated solutions. The popularization of service-oriented architectures (SOAs) and cloud vendors like AWS, Azure, and GCP has also helped. The what and how of integrated-interoperable solutions for PMs: Integrated solutions (IS), as I see them, are of two kinds — one, in which as a health tech company, we help our customers (health systems, insurance companies, direct to consumers) accomplish not just one, but most/all tasks in a business process. For example, a B2B IS in value-based care contract management would mean that we help our customers and health systems by giving an end-to-end solution that helps them enter into, negotiate, plan for, manage, get payments for their value-based contracts with health plans. In the second type of IS, we offer products that can be easily customized to different types of customers. For example, a health management app that people can subscribe to for different programs such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol management, as needed. The app works with different datasets for these programs and uses different analyses and clinical repositories in its backend, but still delivers a consistent user experience across programs to a user who enrolled in multiple programs, say diabetes and weight management. ‘Interoperable’ simply means that one product should be able to talk to other products both in and out of the company. For example, if product-A can alert a doctor about any drug-drug interactions or allergies a patient might have, while she is writing prescriptions for the patient in product-B (an EMR), then product-A does talk to product-B, and hence, is interoperable. This trend is picking up further with the growth of IoT devices, and industry-wide participation in adopting common standards for data exchange. Conclusion Though the article derives much of its context from US health care, I have tried to keep a global lens while choosing these topics. For developing economies like India, digitization is the number one trend as much of the health system is still moving from manual records to digitally store patient and medical data in EMRs. The good news is that India is booming with health-tech innovation and that is where consumerism, wellness, and equitable AI make sense. Once companies develop enough point-solutions for different health system needs and use-cases, Indian health tech will see a move towards creating integrated, interoperable (IGIO) systems as well. There are some other trends such as — use of non-AI emerging tech such as Blockchain in health information management, cloud infrastructure for health tech innovation, big data and analytics to improve operational efficiency in areas such as claims management and compliance reporting, Agile product management for co-developing with and continuously delivering to clients etc. — but I see them either as too nascent, or too old to feature in this list. Finally, as a health tech product manager, you can use the following questions to assess your products against the above trends — (Consumerism) do the products that I manage, empower consumers with choice, information, and actionability? (Wellness) Does my product emphasize keeping them out-of-hospitals and healthy in the first place? (Equitable AI) Am I sure that my product doesn’t discriminate against individuals belonging to underserved populations? (IGIO) And finally, is my product scalable, integrated and interoperable to expand to a platform, in the true sense?

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Health Technology, AI

Predictive Analytics: A Blessing for Healthcare Spaces

Article | July 18, 2023

Introduction Over the past couple of years, there has been a substantial rise in the burden of chronic conditions and treatment costs, along with the growing elderly population, which is transforming the healthcare sector at a rapid pace. As per a study, healthcare spending across the globe is anticipated to reach an unprecedented value to total US$ 18.3 trillion by 2030. In response to these trends, volume-based payment models are being replaced by outcome- or value-based models. Predictive analytics helps health organizations to get in line with these new models and improve patient care and outcomes. From predicting critical conditions such as heart failure and septic shock to preventing readmissions, the recent advancements in big data analytics are boosting the adoption of new predictive analytics solutions that aid clinicians improve outcomes and cut costs. Predictive analytics in healthcare is most helpful with clinical care, administrative tasks, and managing operations. More importantly, the technology is already making a difference in a wide range of healthcare settings, from small private doctor's offices and large academic hospitals to healthcare insurance companies. How is Growing Healthcare Data Favoring the Penetration of Predictive Analytics? The growing inclination toward digitalization in the healthcare industry has led to the creation of huge new data sets. These include radiology images, electronic medical record (EMR) systems, lab results, and health claims data. The amount of data is expected to reach new avenues with increasing genomics and cytogenesis research data in the near future. New data is being generated and collected by the novel medical devices at the edge, such as monitors and patient wearables. In addition, outside the healthcare setting, patients are generating quasi-health data through the use of health monitoring applications, fitness trackers, and personal wearable devices. By using data from these sources, health care providers can find new ways to use predictive modeling for health risks, predictive analytics for medical diagnosis, and prescriptive analytics for personalized medicine. Predictive analytics has become a crucial component of any strategy for health analytics. Today, it's an essential tool for measuring, combining, and making sense of biometric, psychosocial, and behavioral data that wasn't available or was very hard to get a hold of until recently. Here are some of the applications of predictive analytics for healthcare Identifying Patients at Risk Clinical Predictions Disease Progression and Comorbidities Predicting Length of Stay Speeding Treatment of Critical Conditions Reducing Readmissions The Future Story With the growing prominence of innovative technologies across the healthcare industry, a number of health IT providers are focusing on developing their own analytics software and engines to assist healthcare spaces deliver optimal patient care. For instance, in 2020, Eversana, a U.S.-based provider of innovative solutions to the life sciences industry, announced the introduction of its ACTICS predictive analytics solution, which enables clinical spaces to combine multiple data sources into a single comprehensive system. Also, some U.S. companies are partnering with healthcare institutions to develop proprietary algorithms designed to enhance organizational performance, improve clinical care, and increase operational efficiency. Such developments are projected to increase the popularity of predictive analytics solutions in the healthcare sector in the coming years.

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Healthtech Security

Are You Giving Patient Engagement the Proper Care and Attention?

Article | August 31, 2023

As consumers, we crave convenience and simplicity, and across an array of industries, technology has made it increasingly easy to search for and purchase products and services. From getting a pizza delivered to buying a car online, the process often involves entering a few pieces of information, hitting send, and waiting for a confirmation email. A Changing Landscape Unsurprisingly, people want this same level of convenience and simplicitywhen they're seeking care. This change in consumer demand for convenience is further compounded by fundamental shifts in the healthcare ecosystem. Among these shifts are cost-sharing models that have increased patient out-of-pocket expenses, healthcare systems that are increasingly shifting toward delivering value-based care, and innovations in digital health solutions. While patients want to play an active role in managing their well-being, that is often easier said than done in a system that uses a combination of manual processes and non-integrated point solutions to try and meet consumer demand. Disparate and burdensome methods of managing patient engagement often lead to inefficiencies within provider organizations, resulting in missed appointments, increased registration and eligibility-based denials, incomplete payments, higher collections and write-offs, and low patient satisfaction. Consumer Dissatisfaction Healthcare consumers today feel like they're fighting an uphill battle. According to Change Healthcare's 2020 Harris Poll Consumer Experience Index, 67% of respondents agreed that it “feels like every step of the healthcare process is a chore.” A similar percentage, 62%, agreed that “the healthcare system feels like it is set up to be confusing.” Furthermore, if consumers don’t receive the level of convenience and digitization they want from their current provider, they’re more than willing to seek it out elsewhere. In a recent Black Book survey, 80% of respondents indicated they would be willing to change providers for more convenience even if they were receiving good care from their current provider. An even higher percentage of patients,90%, do not think they have to continue seeing a provider if that provider does not “deliver an overall satisfactory digital experience.” A Patient-Centric Approach Improving the patient experiencestarts with humanizing revenue cycle management(RCM) —the administrative process that takes the patient from registration and appointment scheduling to the final payment of a balance. Simply making administrative touchpoints self-service and easy to understand throughout the patient’s financial journey can help humanize revenue cycle management for providers. How is that possible? By thinking about the patients’ side of the administrative process and leveraging innovative technologies like artificial intelligence, robotic process automation (RPA), natural language processing (NLP), and machine learning. The more that providers’ staffs are able to automate repetitive tasks, the more time they're able to spend helping provide a seamless patient engagement journey that is focused on a patient’s specific needs. In other words, reducing human intervention throughout our technologies allows providers to infuse more human interaction with each patient as they navigate their healthcare journey. According to Change Healthcare’s 2020 Harris Poll Consumer Experience Index, what patients really want is a retail-like shopping experience with modern, streamlined communication, as thevast majority (81%) agreed that “shopping for healthcare should be as easy as shopping for other common services” via a streamlined access point online. A clear majority (71%) also said they want their health insurance and healthcare providers (68%) to communicate with them using more-modern platforms. Simplified Scheduling and Payment The entire clinical-care journey is focused on the specific needs of the patient rather than the provider, so why shouldn’t the patient’s financial journey be handled the exact same way? From a patient-satisfaction perspective, patients are not separating their clinical journey from their financial journey, so providers should start viewing it the same way. It should be easy to schedule an appointment and modify that appointment if needed. Patients should have to (securely) provide their personal and insurance information only once (digitally and in advance), then be squared away when they show up for their appointment with their provider. In addition, because of COVID-19 and the heightened awareness surrounding personal interaction, it’s important to provide patients with no-contact check-in and waiting room options. By humanizing RCM, providers can achieve a cohesive end-to-end journey that allows patients to quickly and easily get the care they need complete with clear communication, price transparency , and a provider who truly takes the time to understand their unique situations. By putting the patient back at the center of their care journey, providers can improve care outcomes while also driving maximized business outcomes for their organizations.

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Health Technology, Medical Devices

Boost Your Lab's Efficiency with LIMS Software

Article | April 17, 2023

Contents 1. Getting Started with LIMS Software 2. Benefits of Incorporating LIMS Software into Lab Management 3. LIMS Software Classification 4. Selecting the Right LIMS Software: A Comparison of Variants 5. How LIMS Software Revolutionized Laboratory Management 6. Future Scope 1. Getting Started with LIMS Software Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) software automates laboratory operations, improves productivity, and ensures the accuracy as well as reliability of laboratory data. It can be implemented in clinical laboratories, research & development labs, and environmental testing labs and tailored to meet specific needs. LIMS software seamlessly integrates with other laboratory systems, such as electronic lab notebooks and scientific data management systems. LIMS class software enables storing and managing all information in one place, improving day-to-day work. Yet, research reveals that still 40% of industry leaders 'had not embarked on applying digital to research and development or quality control labs'. (Source: Accenture) 2. Benefits of Incorporating LIMS Software into Lab Management By implementing LIMS software, laboratories can significantly reduce time spent locating samples and records, entering data, and generating reports. LIMS software also offers additional advantages when integrated into laboratory management, such as 1. Optimizing: LIMS automates laboratory processes, allowing for a paperless environment and increased productivity. It also ensures accurate test results by preventing the use of outdated instruments. 2. Automating: LIMS facilitates the input of essential sample information, including its source, date, time, and location of the collection as well as processing data. 3. Compliant: LIMS helps labs follow FDA regulations by creating an audit trail that tracks all activities, including record creation, modification, and deletion. It also enables electronic signatures to authenticate key activities and keep data secure and traceable. 4. Collaborative: LIMS streamlines inter-laboratory collaboration through the option to share data access. This allows lab technicians from disparate laboratories to be seamlessly assigned to different projects and obtain the required information without disruption. 5. Security: LIMS systems offer various mechanisms for managing user access, such as an in-built user management system with a unique username and password, integration with LDAP or Active Directory for user authentication, and access through an Identity Server. 3. LIMS Software Classification Laboratory Information Management System software can be classified based on several criteria, including functionality, deployment model, industry focus, and the laboratory's needs. Here is a list of critical features that can be considered while classifying LIMS software: 1. Functionality: Different LIMS software may have varying functionality, including sample tracking, data management, instrument integration, quality control, workflow management, and reporting. 2. Deployment Model: LIMS software can be deployed on-premises or in the cloud. On-premises deployment means that the software is installed and run on the laboratory's own servers, while cloud-based deployment means that the software is hosted and maintained by a third-party provider. 3. Industry Focus: LIMS software can be designed for specific industries or applications, such as pharmaceutical research, clinical laboratories, food and beverage testing, environmental testing, and more. 4. Open-Source vs. Proprietary: LIMS software can also be classified as either open-source or proprietary. Open-source software is freely available and can be modified by users, while a company owns proprietary software and requires a license to use it. 5. Scalability: The size of the laboratory and the number of users accessing the LIMS software can also be a factor in classification. Some LIMS software may be more scalable, allowing for easy expansion as the laboratory grows. 6. Integration Capabilities: LIMS software can also be classified based on its ability to integrate with other software or instruments. Some LIMS software may be more flexible and have better integration capabilities than others, allowing for seamless data exchange between different systems. 4. Selecting the Right LIMS Software: A Comparison of Variants While selecting the most appropriate LIMS variant, the wide range of available options can pose a challenge for laboratory decision-makers. To aid in this selection process, a comprehensive comparative analysis of LIMS variants is presented below: 1. Lab managers can adopt an objective approach for evaluating and comparing different LIMS solutions by creating a grading rubric. This involves designing a table with separate columns for each LIMS vendor and rows listing the desired features as well as functionalities. To provide a more comprehensive evaluation, advanced rubrics may include rating each functionality on a particular LIMS using a scale of 1 to 5. 2. Next, it is crucial to review how LIMS solutions are structured and stored. This includes determining whether the solution is on-premise or cloud-based, either as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) or software-as-a-service (SaaS). For optimal flexibility in the laboratory's computing structure, choosing a vendor that offers LIMS as a comprehensive solution is advantageous. 3. Data access must be controlled by using unique user IDs and passwords. Furthermore, data security standards such as HIPAA compliance and SSL encryption will likely be mandatory across many laboratory industries. It is thus imperative to carefully consider and ensure the security features of any potential LIMS solution. 4. To assess the level of support that can be expected with a particular LIMS, one effective method is to directly inquire with the software vendor about outages, response time, and plans of action to address any glitches preemptively. Managing expectations around the LIMS requires asking about the frequency of LIMS updates, including how often the platform is updated, how updates are announced and deployed, and the expected duration of any update-related outages. 5. While selecting a LIMS solution, laboratories must establish a target go-live date, especially when implementing the system in response to, or preparation for, an audit. Software vendors should provide a deployment and implementation timeline, which can be used to compare with the laboratory's objectives and goals. This helps to ensure that the LIMS solution is implemented in a timely and efficient manner. 5. How LIMS Software Revolutionized Laboratory Management LIMS software has fundamentally revolutionized the laboratory management system in several ways. Before the advent of LIMS, laboratory operations were often paper-based and highly manual, leading to inefficiencies, errors, and inconsistencies. However, with the implementation of LIMS, laboratories have become more efficient, accurate, and compliant. LIMS has also improved laboratory productivity, allowing scientists to focus on higher-value tasks like data analysis and interpretation. It has enabled collaboration between different laboratories, facilitating communication and knowledge sharing between scientists, researchers, and analysts, and is also leading to more significant innovation and progress in the field of science and research. 6. Future Scope The future scope of Laboratory Information Management System software is promising as it continues to evolve and adapt to the changing needs of laboratory management. Potential developments include integrating emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, and robotics, cloud-based solutions for scalability and accessibility, IoT integration for automation and safety, enhanced data analytics for improved decision-making, and mobile applications for on-the-go access. Moreover, with SaaS LIMS, there are no license costs, minimal installation fees, and no need for in-house servers or databanks, resulting in reduced IT maintenance costs for hardware and software.

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Spotlight

SoutheastHEALTH

SoutheastHEALTH is a far-reaching network of providers and facilities including Southeast Hospital in Cape Girardeau, Mo., which provides a regional system of healthcare services throughout a multi-state region.

Related News

2020 Elections Healthcare Debate Truths, Half-Truths, And Falsehoods

forbes.com | July 08, 2019

Healthcare may emerge as the number one issue in the 2020 election. In itself this isnt surprising, given that for many decades the electorate has considered healthcare a key issue.And, the truth is healthcare access continues to be a major problem in the U.S., along with inequalities in outcomes, relatively high prices for healthcare services, and high out-of-pocket spending. Democratic presidential candidates have weighed in on these issues.Without more clarity, however, the debate runs the risk of unraveling into exercises in sophistry.Politicians in America have had a knack for telling half-truths or even untruths about healthcare. For example, in 2012, John Boehner claimed that the U.S. has the best healthcare delivery system in the world. And, just prior to signing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law, President Obamastated if you like your healthcare plan, you can keep it.

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Adelaide IT services provider Chamonix lands $8 million govt healthcare software deal

Nico Arboleda | July 08, 2019

Adelaide-based IT services provider Chamonix IT Management Consulting has scored an $8 million contract with the Australian Digital Health Agency (ADHA).The contract is to develop and support a Health Identifier and PCEHR System HIPS, and a PCHER is a Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record.HIPS is a My Health Record (MHR) integration software that is owned by ADHA. The software is used by hospitals and private diagnostic providers to connect to the national My Health Record infrastructure.An ADHA spokesperson told CRN that Chamonix was picked out from an open tender process.Chamonix was founded in 2010 in Adelaide and was a CRN Fast50 lister in 2014 due to its work with Microsoft, achieving Gold Partner status in 2012. The company also has an office in Brisbane, which opened in 2016.

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3 exciting small cap ASX healthcare shares to watch in FY203 exciting small cap ASX healthcare shares to watch in FY20

Unified Health care Home Healthcare COPD | July 08, 2019

Because of positive tailwinds such as ageing populations, increased chronic disease burden, and better technologies, I believe demand for healthcare services will grow strongly over the next decade. In light of this, I think the healthcare sector could be a great place to look for small cap shares to buy and hold.Three growing healthcare shares that I think are worth looking closely at are listed below. Heres why I like them. Alcidion is an informatics solutions provider which develops and sells healthcare analytics software for hospitals and other healthcare providers. This software aims to improve the efficacy and cost of delivering services to patients and reduce hospital-acquired complications. Earlier this year the company won its first major contract with the Dartford and Gravesham National Health Service (NHS) Trust in the United Kingdom. Given how the NHS is currently transitioning to a paperless environment, I wouldnt be surprised to see more and more large contracts being won over the coming 12 months.

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2020 Elections Healthcare Debate Truths, Half-Truths, And Falsehoods

forbes.com | July 08, 2019

Healthcare may emerge as the number one issue in the 2020 election. In itself this isnt surprising, given that for many decades the electorate has considered healthcare a key issue.And, the truth is healthcare access continues to be a major problem in the U.S., along with inequalities in outcomes, relatively high prices for healthcare services, and high out-of-pocket spending. Democratic presidential candidates have weighed in on these issues.Without more clarity, however, the debate runs the risk of unraveling into exercises in sophistry.Politicians in America have had a knack for telling half-truths or even untruths about healthcare. For example, in 2012, John Boehner claimed that the U.S. has the best healthcare delivery system in the world. And, just prior to signing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law, President Obamastated if you like your healthcare plan, you can keep it.

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Adelaide IT services provider Chamonix lands $8 million govt healthcare software deal

Nico Arboleda | July 08, 2019

Adelaide-based IT services provider Chamonix IT Management Consulting has scored an $8 million contract with the Australian Digital Health Agency (ADHA).The contract is to develop and support a Health Identifier and PCEHR System HIPS, and a PCHER is a Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record.HIPS is a My Health Record (MHR) integration software that is owned by ADHA. The software is used by hospitals and private diagnostic providers to connect to the national My Health Record infrastructure.An ADHA spokesperson told CRN that Chamonix was picked out from an open tender process.Chamonix was founded in 2010 in Adelaide and was a CRN Fast50 lister in 2014 due to its work with Microsoft, achieving Gold Partner status in 2012. The company also has an office in Brisbane, which opened in 2016.

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3 exciting small cap ASX healthcare shares to watch in FY203 exciting small cap ASX healthcare shares to watch in FY20

Unified Health care Home Healthcare COPD | July 08, 2019

Because of positive tailwinds such as ageing populations, increased chronic disease burden, and better technologies, I believe demand for healthcare services will grow strongly over the next decade. In light of this, I think the healthcare sector could be a great place to look for small cap shares to buy and hold.Three growing healthcare shares that I think are worth looking closely at are listed below. Heres why I like them. Alcidion is an informatics solutions provider which develops and sells healthcare analytics software for hospitals and other healthcare providers. This software aims to improve the efficacy and cost of delivering services to patients and reduce hospital-acquired complications. Earlier this year the company won its first major contract with the Dartford and Gravesham National Health Service (NHS) Trust in the United Kingdom. Given how the NHS is currently transitioning to a paperless environment, I wouldnt be surprised to see more and more large contracts being won over the coming 12 months.

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