INCREASE THE RISK OF HEART DISEASE AND DIABETES

About what can threaten the health of the habit of watching TV shows in one gulp over a long period of time, doctors said in the publication edition of the Washington Post. Doctors expressed concerned about the view that the recent growth in popularity of streaming services contributed to the fact that a huge number of people have become “drunken” to watch soap operas for example, spending thus their weekends.Experts point out that passion for watching the series reinforces the tendency to immobility, which is very unhealthy.Captured by the plot of the series, people for several hours can still sit on the couch. Meanwhile, long periods of sitting increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, deep vein thrombosis of the lower limbs, and also negatively affects the eyesight and social behavior, say the experts.

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Beaumont Health

Beaumont Health is a not-for-profit organization formed by Beaumont Health System, Botsford Health Care and Oakwood Healthcare to provide high quality, efficient, accessible services in a caring environment for southeastern Michigan residents and beyond.

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

8 Trends for Healthcare in 2021

Article | August 16, 2023

Momentum in digital healthcare transformation… it’s massive, and much needed. As organizations adapt to new modes of care, demands on resources, and consumer expectations, payors and providers are eyeing opportunities to reduce costs, improve care, build awareness, and expand relationships.Here are 8 trends we’re currently tracking into 2021: TREND 1 The evolution of healthcare will be characterized by a reengineering of clinical care and operations around digital health and pervasive real-time use of data and advanced analytics.​ Gartner TREND 2 The current landscape has underscored the importance of improving workflows, achieving greater clinical efficiencies and better integrating data across organizations through tools like natural language processing, remote process automation, and cloud-based technologies. Becker’s Hospital Review TREND 3 Now more than ever, healthcare organizations must build a multi-channel digital experience portfolio to deliver personalized consumer-centric experiences that drive engagement and reduce costs. Becker’s Hospital Review TREND 4 With increasing emphasis on cross-platform (EHR, CRM, CMS, virtual health, etc.) and cross-organizational data portability, advanced APIs and interoperability should ensure secure and efficient data exchanges between EHR systems, devices, and various channels of care. Forbes TREND 5 COVID-19 has pushed telehealth into the mainstream, and adoption has gained impressive traction. Expect expansions of asynchronous virtual care leveraging integrated wearable technologies. Business Insider Intelligence / Research and Markets TREND 6 With more healthcare data available, artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies will provide greater speed and insights to analyze and predict outcomes that drive change in patient care. Gartner / Forrester TREND 7 Organizations will continue looking to Social Determinant of Health strategies to help understand health disparities – including those highlighted through COVID-19 infections – and alleviate some of the financial strains while delivering high quality care. Fierce Healthcare / Healthify TREND 8 Successfully making the transition to offering greater price transparency will not only put healthcare organizations in compliance, but help satisfy patient demand, increasing patient engagement and even point-of-service payments. Health Leaders Media The strategy imperative With so much call for transformation, it’s vital to resist the pull of “shiny object” point solutions and to, instead, build a fully-considered digital strategy. Need help getting started? Our healthcare experts help the nation’s largest providers and payers navigate and execute their north star strategy, tackling specific challenges through assessments, best-practice advice, strategy, and roadmaps. Explore our thought leadership and connect with us to learn more today.

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Health Technology, AI

Why the future of healthcare is (mostly) in the cloud

Article | July 18, 2023

Healthcare leaders are embracing the benefits of the cloud and software as a service (SaaS) after the pandemic challenged them to adapt and innovate like never before. 66% of them expect to move their technology infrastructures to the cloud this year – a number that is set to rise to 96% by 2024 [1]. Yet moving to the cloud is more than just a technology transformation. It’s an organizational transformation. Through cloud-based platforms and solutions, healthcare systems can begin to unlock clinical and operational insights at scale while speeding up innovation cycles for continuous value delivery. Integrating data across the care continuum In many ways, COVID-19 catapulted healthcare into the future. The pandemic created a new urgency for healthcare leaders to expand their virtual care offerings as a way of connecting with patients beyond the walls of the hospital. At the same time, they wanted the flexibility to scale up or down without large upfront capital expenditures. Effective crisis management also required the rapid exchange of patient information across systems and care settings. Thanks to the flexibility of pay-as-you-go cloud-based services and solutions, healthcare providers were able to quickly scale up digital health technologies to meet new demands. As a result, the acceptance of cloud has increased remarkably [2]. Keeping patient data secure and compliant As healthcare leaders embark on this journey to the cloud, data protection is a critical consideration. Data processing in healthcare must comply with rigorous standards, whether it is HIPAA in the US or GDPR in the EU. Unfortunately, healthcare organizations also remain a top target for data breaches, calling for additional data security protection measures [3]. While the need for data security and regulatory compliance has historically motivated healthcare organizations to keep data on premises, today there is a growing awareness that moving to the cloud can in fact be the better road to travel. In fact, 60% of healthcare leaders now cite security as one of the top benefits of the cloud [4]. When healthcare organizations rely on their own data centers, they are responsible for security from end to end, which can become prohibitively complex and time-consuming as IT infrastructures expand over time. Cloud-based services and solutions can reduce dependency on local hardware to store sensitive data while automated software updates keep systems current. Turning data into insights at scale at the point of care Working from these foundations, the next big opportunity in healthcare is to capture the insights in the data that we are beginning to connect and integrate. This is where the cloud is also turning into a vital enabler, with its powerful computing resources and advanced machine learning capabilities, offered as microservices. These microservices provide the building blocks to develop new digital solutions that, once validated and approved, can be deployed at scale to help improve clinical outcomes and operational efficiency. Enabling rapid experimentation and continuous value delivery Embracing the cloud also changes the very nature of innovation in healthcare. Healthcare-compliant cloud platforms offer a flexible foundation for rapid development and testing of digital applications. Cross-functional teams working in short and agile cycles can put new digital applications into the hands of physicians or patients more quickly, and then add new or improved features and functionalities as they gather additional user feedback. That means healthcare organizations get to innovate faster. And in smaller, more digestible increments. Moving to the cloud is not all or nothing Of course, none of this is to suggest that moving to the cloud is like switching a button. It’s a complex and multi-year journey for most of our customers. And it’s quite a journey for Philips, too. Any organization that has accumulated a large number of legacy systems and infrastructures over the years will have to manage a hybrid architecture during their journey to the cloud [5].

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

6 Tips On Discussing Your Mental Health Issues With Your Friends

Article | September 8, 2023

Do you have a difficult time explaining your mental health issues to your family and friends? If so, here are six suggestions on how to discuss your mental health issues with your friends and relatives. 1. Talk to a counselor: The most important thing that you need to do is to talk to a counselor about your mental health problems. Seeking professional help will go a long way in overcoming your current issues. In addition, a counselor will be able to give you additional advice on how to deal with your friends and family members. 2. Don’t argue with others: It is important that you do not get into arguments with those who are giving you a hard time. Your number one priority is getting your life back on track. Your health is more important than what other people may think. 3. Watch who you hang out with: It is important to surround yourself with positive people. Try to keep your distance from those people who are giving you a difficult time. Remember that your goal is to remain positive and hopeful. Do not let the negative people in your life bring you down. 4. You are not alone: It can be very frustrating to deal with your mental health issues when your friends and relatives are on your case. Remember, you are not alone. There are millions of people around the world who struggle with their fears, anxieties, and depression. The key is to find those people who can relate to you. 5. Stand your ground: It is important to stand your ground when dealing with family members and friends who are giving you a hard time. Explain your situation and your feelings to the people in your life, however don’t let them hassle you. Your number one priority is to get better and not to please everyone that you know. 6. Join a support group: There are many mental health support groups in your area that can help you. Many hospitals, churches, and counselors in your area will be able to provide you with a list of groups. These mental health organizations will be supportive of your situation and they can give you additional advice regarding your problems.

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AI

How AI is levelling the playing field when it comes to gender and healthcare

Article | December 21, 2021

Global efforts to tackle gender inequality have grown in recent years. But there is still so much to be done. Figures from the United Nations show that outcomes for women and girls continue to lag across a range of issues, including poverty, education, work and health. And according to the World Economic Forum, at the current rate, it will take 108 years to close the gender gap. Although healthcare is founded in objectivity and science, gender bias is still remarkably common. We wanted to understand more about female perceptions of healthcare, so we undertook consumer research that delved into the experiences of women compared to men. The results pointed to a clear disparity, finding that women are less likely to visit the doctor when they have symptoms of ill health and, in some cases, are taken less seriously when they do seek medical advice. Women being left behind According to our research, a significant proportion of British women feel disappointed in the healthcare they receive, with one in five reporting they weren’t taken seriously when presenting symptoms to a healthcare provider. What’s more, a staggering one in four said they are reluctant to seek medical advice at all for fear of wasting a GP’s time. These statistics suggest that, not only are female experiences of healthcare damaging their relationship with clinicians, but they could be eroding confidence in recognising and acting on warning signs and symptoms too. This sentiment is particularly evident when focusing on cardiac care. One in eight women (13%) feel ignored when presenting symptoms of heart disease to healthcare professionals, compared to just 4% of men. And of UK adults who have received a coronary heart disease (CHD) diagnosis, women experiencing symptoms were 55% more likely than men to visit the doctor multiple times before receiving a referral for further investigation. On top of this, women are five times more likely to receive a false finding from the cardiac stress tests that are traditionally used to assess heart health. “There does appear to be a gender bias in onward referral to secondary care and for diagnostics in the local area, which is influenced by the attending healthcare professionals’ risk assessment. Traditional teaching has led to gender bias, as we are programmed to attribute a lower level of pre-test probability and risk to females. This may have contributed to a general lack of awareness around cardiovascular health in women. For example, in a survey I carried out among more than 600 female employees working within North West Anglia NHS Foundation Trust, 82% said they didn’t feel informed about their cardiovascular health. Considering participants included some of the most medically informed women in the UK, the results speak volumes about how we view cardiac health among women.” - Dr Rebecca Schofield, consultant cardiologist at North West Anglia NHS Foundation Trust These widespread misconceptions around heart disease and heart attacks are often exacerbated by what we see in the media – think of the countless TV stereotypes of male characters clutching their chests and falling to the floor. But given that CHD is responsible for one in 13 female deaths, it appears that public health efforts have failed to make people aware of the risks for women. It is, perhaps, not surprising then that 42% of women with CHD did not immediately recognise their symptoms as signs of heart disease. In short, women are missing out on time-critical diagnoses and treatment due to a lack of awareness and education among both healthcare providers and the public. Technologies making a difference Thankfully, progress is being made to improve healthcare outcomes for women. Innovative technologies are increasingly providing diagnostic solutions that can reduce incidences of human bias and give clinicians greater clarity on the presence or severity of different conditions in their female patients. For example, AI is already being used to detect diseases such as cancer more accurately. Its adoption is facilitating reviews and translations of mammograms 30 times faster, with 99% accuracy, reducing the need for unnecessary biopsies. There’s extraordinary potential for AI and healthcare, and it’s something the NHS continues to recognise, most recently with the launch of its Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (AI Lab) and NHS England’s (NHSE) MedTech Funding Mandate. The latter aims to accelerate the uptake of selected innovative medical devices, diagnostics, and digital products to patients. As part of the NHS efforts, NHSE has mandated the HeartFlow Analysis for use in hospitals across England for patients, male or female, who might otherwise be sent for a cardiac stress test. The HeartFlow Analysis is a gender-neutral technology that takes data from a coronary CT scan of the heart and leverages deep learning (a form of AI) and highly trained analysts to create a personalised, digital 3D model of each patient’s coronary arteries. This then helps clinicians to quickly diagnose CHD and decide the appropriate treatment for patients of any gender. Time spent in hospital is minimised for patients and often layered testing and unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures can be avoided. Final thoughts While AI is helping us tackle gender bias in certain areas such as oncologic and cardiac testing, healthcare professionals are not absolved of responsibility when it comes to confronting this problem. It remains incumbent upon clinicians to recognise unconscious bias that would deter them from referring women or minority patients for much-needed testing. Outside of the hospital, public health education efforts must expand so that far more of us can recognise shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting, back or jaw pain, and other symptoms beyond chest pain to be indicators of a heart attack in a woman. Knowing what to look for and overcoming personal bias that might lead to these signs being disregarded, may allow us to help one of the more than 100 women who will experience a heart attack in the UK today.

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Spotlight

Beaumont Health

Beaumont Health is a not-for-profit organization formed by Beaumont Health System, Botsford Health Care and Oakwood Healthcare to provide high quality, efficient, accessible services in a caring environment for southeastern Michigan residents and beyond.

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2020 Elections Healthcare Debate Truths, Half-Truths, And Falsehoods

forbes.com | July 08, 2019

Healthcare may emerge as the number one issue in the 2020 election. In itself this isnt surprising, given that for many decades the electorate has considered healthcare a key issue.And, the truth is healthcare access continues to be a major problem in the U.S., along with inequalities in outcomes, relatively high prices for healthcare services, and high out-of-pocket spending. Democratic presidential candidates have weighed in on these issues.Without more clarity, however, the debate runs the risk of unraveling into exercises in sophistry.Politicians in America have had a knack for telling half-truths or even untruths about healthcare. For example, in 2012, John Boehner claimed that the U.S. has the best healthcare delivery system in the world. And, just prior to signing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law, President Obamastated if you like your healthcare plan, you can keep it.

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Adelaide IT services provider Chamonix lands $8 million govt healthcare software deal

Nico Arboleda | July 08, 2019

Adelaide-based IT services provider Chamonix IT Management Consulting has scored an $8 million contract with the Australian Digital Health Agency (ADHA).The contract is to develop and support a Health Identifier and PCEHR System HIPS, and a PCHER is a Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record.HIPS is a My Health Record (MHR) integration software that is owned by ADHA. The software is used by hospitals and private diagnostic providers to connect to the national My Health Record infrastructure.An ADHA spokesperson told CRN that Chamonix was picked out from an open tender process.Chamonix was founded in 2010 in Adelaide and was a CRN Fast50 lister in 2014 due to its work with Microsoft, achieving Gold Partner status in 2012. The company also has an office in Brisbane, which opened in 2016.

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3 exciting small cap ASX healthcare shares to watch in FY203 exciting small cap ASX healthcare shares to watch in FY20

Unified Health care Home Healthcare COPD | July 08, 2019

Because of positive tailwinds such as ageing populations, increased chronic disease burden, and better technologies, I believe demand for healthcare services will grow strongly over the next decade. In light of this, I think the healthcare sector could be a great place to look for small cap shares to buy and hold.Three growing healthcare shares that I think are worth looking closely at are listed below. Heres why I like them. Alcidion is an informatics solutions provider which develops and sells healthcare analytics software for hospitals and other healthcare providers. This software aims to improve the efficacy and cost of delivering services to patients and reduce hospital-acquired complications. Earlier this year the company won its first major contract with the Dartford and Gravesham National Health Service (NHS) Trust in the United Kingdom. Given how the NHS is currently transitioning to a paperless environment, I wouldnt be surprised to see more and more large contracts being won over the coming 12 months.

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2020 Elections Healthcare Debate Truths, Half-Truths, And Falsehoods

forbes.com | July 08, 2019

Healthcare may emerge as the number one issue in the 2020 election. In itself this isnt surprising, given that for many decades the electorate has considered healthcare a key issue.And, the truth is healthcare access continues to be a major problem in the U.S., along with inequalities in outcomes, relatively high prices for healthcare services, and high out-of-pocket spending. Democratic presidential candidates have weighed in on these issues.Without more clarity, however, the debate runs the risk of unraveling into exercises in sophistry.Politicians in America have had a knack for telling half-truths or even untruths about healthcare. For example, in 2012, John Boehner claimed that the U.S. has the best healthcare delivery system in the world. And, just prior to signing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law, President Obamastated if you like your healthcare plan, you can keep it.

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Adelaide IT services provider Chamonix lands $8 million govt healthcare software deal

Nico Arboleda | July 08, 2019

Adelaide-based IT services provider Chamonix IT Management Consulting has scored an $8 million contract with the Australian Digital Health Agency (ADHA).The contract is to develop and support a Health Identifier and PCEHR System HIPS, and a PCHER is a Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record.HIPS is a My Health Record (MHR) integration software that is owned by ADHA. The software is used by hospitals and private diagnostic providers to connect to the national My Health Record infrastructure.An ADHA spokesperson told CRN that Chamonix was picked out from an open tender process.Chamonix was founded in 2010 in Adelaide and was a CRN Fast50 lister in 2014 due to its work with Microsoft, achieving Gold Partner status in 2012. The company also has an office in Brisbane, which opened in 2016.

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3 exciting small cap ASX healthcare shares to watch in FY203 exciting small cap ASX healthcare shares to watch in FY20

Unified Health care Home Healthcare COPD | July 08, 2019

Because of positive tailwinds such as ageing populations, increased chronic disease burden, and better technologies, I believe demand for healthcare services will grow strongly over the next decade. In light of this, I think the healthcare sector could be a great place to look for small cap shares to buy and hold.Three growing healthcare shares that I think are worth looking closely at are listed below. Heres why I like them. Alcidion is an informatics solutions provider which develops and sells healthcare analytics software for hospitals and other healthcare providers. This software aims to improve the efficacy and cost of delivering services to patients and reduce hospital-acquired complications. Earlier this year the company won its first major contract with the Dartford and Gravesham National Health Service (NHS) Trust in the United Kingdom. Given how the NHS is currently transitioning to a paperless environment, I wouldnt be surprised to see more and more large contracts being won over the coming 12 months.

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