Health Blogs I Read

In my time blogging, I’ve had the honor of “meeting” some other great bloggers.
Through sites like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+ and others, I’ve been able to connect with many of these bloggers and definitely consider them (online) friends.
Today, I’m just sharing a list of blogs that I read and who’s authors I’ve “met”
I’d also highly recommend a site that I contribute to, Wellness Media. Wellness Media compiles all of the best health and wellness articles on the web in one place.

Spotlight

Medical Services Ltd

In the UK Medical Services remain the most experienced and longest serving provider of non-emergency transport services (NEPTS). We have joined with Falck, the leader and one of the most respected global providers of emergency medical services (EMS) operating in 43 countries, to underpin our knowledge and support our development in the new ambulance or patient transport market sector.

OTHER ARTICLES
Digital Healthcare

Can Medical Providers Recommend E-cigarettes for Smoking Cessation?

Article | November 29, 2023

Smoking has a lot of consequences to one’s health. It can lead to cancer, heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease—all of which are chronic diseases. This is part of the reason why the Health and Human Services agency reports that 70% of adult smokers want to quit. As a medical provider, adults looking to stop smoking will come to you for advice and treatment. One alternative smoking product you might want to recommend is an e-cigarette, given their prevalence in recent years. In this article, let’s take a deeper look at whether e-cigarettes’ should be recommended for smoking cessation and what other treatment options to endorse to patients. Are e-cigarettes approved for smoking cessation? Electronic cigarettes, more commonly known as e-cigarettes, are devices that vaporize nicotine-based liquid to be inhaled by its user. It almost replicates the experience of smoking a cigarette due to the device’s shape and the vapor it produces. However, the FDA has yet to approve e-cigarettes for smoking cessation because there is currently limited research on their effectiveness, benefits, and risks for the human body. Additionally, scientists at the University of California found harmful metals in the vapor from tank-style e-cigarettes. These e-cigarettes are equipped with high-power batteries and atomizers to store more liquid. These result in high concentrations of metals like iron, lead, and nickel in the vapor. Exposure to and inhaling metallic particles may impair lung function and cause chronic respiratory diseases. As such, medical providers should not recommend e-cigarettes for smoking cessation. What can medical providers recommend for smoking cessation? Smoking cessation medication Presently, two FDA-approved prescription medicines for smoking cessation are Bupropion and Varenicline. Bupropion is an antidepressant that decreases tobacco cravings and withdrawal symptoms. It does this by increasing the brain chemicals dopamine and noradrenaline. This comes in a pill and can be used alongside other smoking cessation aids. Varenicline also reduces cravings and nicotine withdrawal symptoms. It blocks nicotine receptors in the brain, decreasing the amount of enjoyment one gets from smoking. One thing to note about this is that it will take several days for Varenicline's effects to take place. Therefore, it's best to prescribe these pills 1-2 weeks before the patient quits smoking. Like Bupropion, Varenicline may be used simultaneously with other quit-smoking products. Nicotine Replacement Therapy Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is a treatment involving nicotine consumption at gradually decreasing levels. This reduces the patient’s desire to smoke without them having to quit cold turkey. NRT involves using nicotine alternatives that don’t produce smoke, such as nicotine pouches and nicotine gum. Nicotine pouches are oral products containing ingredients like nicotine, flavoring, and plant-based fibers. These are placed between the lip and gum, where nicotine is absorbed into the bloodstream. Different variations have different strengths. On! pouches come in different strengths: 2mg, 4mg, and 8mg. Patients may start from 8mg variants and gradually decrease this dosage as their NRT progresses. Pouches also come in a wide range of flavors—including citrus, mint, and berry—to entice users. Meanwhile, nicotine gum is chewing gum that contains nicotine. It is chewed a few times before being parked between the gums and cheek for nicotine absorption. The nicotine gums by Lucy are a significantly better alternative for tobacco users. Like pouches, this gum comes in several flavors, such as cinnamon, mango, and wintergreen, and different strengths ranging from 2mg to 6mg. Counseling The recommendations mentioned above—medication and NRT—are more effective when coupled with counseling. A Primary Care Respiratory Medicine study revealed that successful smoking cessation is best attained through pharmacological treatment and counseling. Sessions typically involve a patient meeting with a counselor and they discuss their smoking habits, possible causes, and how to mitigate them. Medical providers should include counseling in addition to medication and NRT. E-cigarettes have yet to be approved by the FDA as smoking cessation aids. For now, medical providers should provide medication, NRT, and counseling to patients who want to quit smoking.

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

Addressing social determinants of health with data interoperability

Article | July 14, 2023

Across the spectrum of healthcare delivery – payor, provider, vendor, consumer, there is a land rush underway to embrace consumer-centric care. With tools like value-based care, chronic disease management, retail services, analytics, and remote patient monitoring, healthcare organizations are pivoting towards capabilities that provide a deeper understanding of patient behaviors and address the whole patient and not just the condition.

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

The Top Wellness Programs Most Employees Prefer: Weight Management, Smoking Cessation, and Mental Health

Article | August 21, 2023

It’s no secret that the working world has changed these past few years, but employees have also undergone a lot of personal transformation due to these shifts. Struggles with health, home life, or personal issues can make it hard for them to work. Burnout is increasing worldwide, with 40% of desk-job workers feeling mentally distanced from work, depleted of energy, and increased negativity. Younger workers are already becoming drained by work life, which could spell trouble for future generations of employees. Despite these challenges, the workplace is the best place to help staff improve their wellness, especially since they spend most of their time working or in the office. Wellness programs can be implemented to help employees feel rejuvenated and respected, which will boost their performance at work. Here are some examples of programs your workers might enjoy Weight Management Programs The idea of a weight management program at work may seem like something employees could be offended by, but it can help workers build healthy habits and assess their lifestyle to help them achieve better health. Employees can learn to manage their diet better, leading to weight loss and a lowered risk of certain health conditions. These programs can also identify the need for medical weight loss strategies. For employees struggling with pre-obesity—a complex disease influenced by several factors often out of an individual’s control—personalized lifestyle changes and FDA-approved medications can be recommended. With chronic weight issues, doctors can prescribe medications that can help produce an average of 15% weight loss, especially when individual biology makes doing so harder. Employees can look for the help they need for wellness and weight loss, which can help them feel cared for by the company. When workers are at their peak physically, they can enjoy a healthier lifestyle and will be more efficient at work. Quit Smoking Programs Smoking is usually a means for employees to reduce stress, but it can greatly impact their personal and professional lives. Smokers tend to be more absent or disengaged at work than non-smokers. Presenteeism at work is also associated with heavy smoking. Employees coming to work despite health issues can lead to subpar performances. This can cost workplaces a lot of money in lost productivity, and workers will also suffer from health consequences. Smoking cessation programs can help employees reduce their tobacco consumption and quit smoking for better health and productivity. These programs can include counseling, suggesting smoking cessation products or nicotine replacement therapy, or other initiatives tailored to individuals. Your staff may need more motivation when trying to quit, so having more support and a community to confide in can help. Mental Health Programs Mental health in the workplace was largely ignored for many years, as many saw it as a personal issue. However, work can contribute significantly to employees’ mental health problems or exacerbate mental illnesses like anxiety and depression. Improving these conditions is vital to improving many aspects of life for employees. Workers will better enjoy work and perform well when they know they’re being supported. Mental health is also paramount to sustainable development and plays a significant role in transforming the world as a whole. Treating and monitoring mental wellness should be prioritized at work and beyond. Though companies may not have the means to properly diagnose or treat workers’ mental illnesses, mental health programs can help give employees and managers the education and resources to help improve mental wellness. Education and training on mental health can aid people in spotting issues and having them addressed or equip people with the ability to provide proper support or encouragement. These programs can also help the business take the initiative and offer other resources to improve mental health. That can be through mental health sick leaves, adding napping or gaming areas to the office, or offering mental health apps or counseling in benefits packages. When your staff is appreciated and taken care of, it’ll improve their overall well-being and life at work and home.

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Risks of Caregiver Injury in Patient Transfers

Article | December 8, 2020

A cruelly ironic truth is that nurses and other caregivers assisting injured and ill patients often wind up injured themselves. In fact, the caregiver profession has among the highest rates of injury, with back injuries being the most common and the most debilitating. Every year, more than 10% of caregivers leave the field because of back injuries. More than half of all caregivers will experience chronic back pain. Most back injuries to caregivers happen when lifting patients from beds or wheelchairs. Injuries can occur instantly, but they can develop over time as well, often without the caregiver’s awareness. For example, the caregiver can sustain disc damage gradually and not feel any pain, and by the time he or she does experience pain, there can already be serious damage.

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Spotlight

Medical Services Ltd

In the UK Medical Services remain the most experienced and longest serving provider of non-emergency transport services (NEPTS). We have joined with Falck, the leader and one of the most respected global providers of emergency medical services (EMS) operating in 43 countries, to underpin our knowledge and support our development in the new ambulance or patient transport market sector.

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