Body Fat Distribution Linked To Higher Risk Of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

| June 10, 2019

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In the first prospective study of directly measured body fat distribution and prostate cancer risk, investigators found that higher levels of abdominal and thigh fat are associated with an increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may lead to a better understanding of the relationship between obesity and prostate cancer and provide new insights for treatment.
Previous studies have shown that obesity is associated with an elevated risk of advanced prostate cancer and a poorer prognosis after diagnosis. Also, emerging evidence suggests that the specific distribution of fat in the body may be an important factor.

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With more than 3500 staff and covering an area a quarter of the size of Victoria, Bendigo Health Care Group (commonly known as Bendigo Health) is an expanding regional health service offering the advantages of city life combined with the beauty and freedom that comes from living in a regional area. Bendigo Health, around 665 bed service*, treated almost 42,000 inpatients, triaged more than 50,000 emergency attendees and welcomed more than 1,400 new born babies in the reporting period July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2016.

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