A system upgrade gives this healthcare network an it cure

We’ve all heard the adage, physician, heal thyself.here’s a lesser known version healthcare network, heal thy technology ills.and with patients out of 21 regional locations across 2 states, complete with two urgent care facilities, an emergency care center, and over 200 medical providers on staff, one regional healthcare system meant business.so when it comes to maintaining a reliable it network, that’s a lot of ground to cover. and a lot of people and devices to keep track of.

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DB Healthcare, Inc. and DB Blockchain

DB Healthcare provides staffing and consulting services in the area of Healthcare Information Technology. DB Healthcare services help you achieve your clinical and business goals by integrating information technology and people during project implementation, transformation and on-going support. DB Healthcare received gold seal of approval from The Joint Commission.

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Health Technology, AI

Unlocking Better Health Online: Exploring Power of EHR Telemedicine

Article | July 18, 2023

Embark on a journey into the frontier of healthcare innovation in this article. Discover how EHR telemedicine and remote patient monitoring serve as catalysts, driving forward a new era in healthcare. Contents 1. Integration of EHRs in Telemedicine and Remote Patient Monitoring 2. Technical Challenges and Solutions in EHR Integration 3. Financial Analysis: Cost-Benefit Assessment of Integration 4. Data Privacy and Consent in Integrated EHR-Telemedicine Systems 5. Forging Stronger Patient-Clinician Relationships 1. Integration of EHRs in Telemedicine and Remote Patient Monitoring EHR telemedicine and remote patient monitoring have reshaped healthcare delivery by seamlessly integrating electronic health records, allowing healthcare providers and patients to exchange information effortlessly, regardless of geographical barriers. This synergy empowers healthcare professionals to access patients' comprehensive medical histories in real time, facilitating more informed decision-making during virtual consultations. During the spring of 2020, when pandemic restrictions kept most people in the US at home, the use of telehealth rose to about 51%. [Source: Elation Health] Moreover, it enhances the accuracy of remote patient monitoring by providing up-to-date data, enabling timely interventions and improving overall healthcare outcomes. Integrating EHR telemedicine systems enhances efficiency and ensures that patient care remains at the forefront of modern healthcare, transcending traditional physical boundaries. 2. Technical Challenges and Solutions in EHR Integration Navigating telehealth EHR integration and remote patient monitoring solutions uncovers a range of technical challenges, each with its own set of potential remedies. These include interoperability issues, which can be mitigated by adopting standardized data formats like HL7 FHIR. EHR interoperability solutions may involve using data exchange protocols such as HL7's Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture (C-CDA) or developing custom APIs to facilitate seamless data exchange between EHRs and telemedicine platforms. Additionally, the imperative need for data security and privacy is achieved through robust encryption and adherence to regulations like HIPAA or GDPR. Data integration challenges arising from varying EHR data storage methods can be resolved using middleware or integration platforms. Investing in telecom infrastructure and developing offline-capable telemedicine apps can address limited connectivity in remote areas. Ensuring real-time data access involves optimizing EHR databases and creating low-latency systems. Other challenges encompass integrating data from medical devices, ensuring data accuracy, scalability, user-friendly interfaces, regulatory compliance, and cost management strategies. 3. Financial Analysis: Cost-Benefit Assessment of Integration When contemplating the integration of EHR telemedicine and remote patient monitoring systems, conducting a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis is crucial. This assessment covers financial aspects, including initial implementation costs (software development, hardware upgrades, training, and data migration), ongoing operational expenses (maintenance and data storage), and potential efficiency gains (streamlined workflows and improved data accessibility). It also evaluates the impact on patient outcomes, satisfaction, and financial benefits of enhanced healthcare quality, reduced readmissions, and increased patient engagement. Healthcare organizations can estimate cost savings in remote patient monitoring and explore expanding telemedicine services to underserved populations to make informed financial decisions. Additionally, this analysis considers long-term financial viability and alignment with organizational goals, including regulatory compliance costs, risk assessment, scalability considerations, and the competitive advantages of integrated telemedicine services. By calculating ROI and assessing potential risks, healthcare entities can develop risk mitigation strategies, ensuring that EHR integration in telemedicine and remote patient monitoring enhances healthcare delivery and aligns with the organization's financial sustainability and long-term success. 4. Data Privacy and Consent in Integrated EHR-Telemedicine Systems Data privacy and obtaining informed consent are paramount in integrated EHR and telemedicine systems. Patients should provide explicit consent, understanding the data collected and its intended use, with strict encryption protocols safeguarding data during transmission. Access controls and data minimization practices restrict unauthorized access, while patient portals enable individuals to manage their data-sharing preferences and revoke consent if needed. Compliance with regulations such as HIPAA or GDPR is crucial, as is maintaining comprehensive audit trails to track data access. Training, awareness, and robust incident response plans fortify data privacy efforts, fostering trust and transparency in these integrated systems where healthcare organizations and patients share responsibility for secure data handling. 5. Forging Stronger Patient-Clinician Relationships Integrating EHR telemedicine and remote monitoring systems goes beyond mere efficiency and accessibility objectives. It serves as a catalyst for nurturing more substantial and meaningful patient-clinician relationships. This fusion of technology and healthcare has the capacity to bridge physical distances, allowing clinicians to truly understand and engage with their patients on a deeper level. Patients, armed with increased access to their health data, become more active participants in their healthcare, while clinicians, with their comprehensive information, can offer more personalized and informed guidance. The potential of EHR telemedicine reaches far beyond the digital screen; it empowers both patients and clinicians to collaborate in pursuit of improved health outcomes, ushering in a new era of patient-centric care grounded in trust, communication, and shared knowledge.

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

Enhancing Network Resilience in the Healthcare Sector to Prevent Downtime and Unusable Uptime

Article | September 7, 2023

Your patients have grown to trust your expertise and recommendations in matters regarding their healthcare. As the sector transitions into a more digital playing field, uninterrupted network connectivity is more than just a bonus; it’s a necessity. While there are many different challenges to completely integrating your practice into the digital world, internet outages are the costliest. Downtime can be caused by various factors, which can compromise patient safety, the faith your team instills in you, and your practice’s reputation and revenue. However, investing in the means to maintain a resilient network lets you maximize your network uptime to optimize resources. We'll look at four different strategies and their benefits for your infrastructure so you can focus on what you do best: providing healthcare excellence to your patients. Strengthening Network Infrastructure The traditional way of doing things may be great for your remedies and techniques. Still, with a growing number of patients and their contextually relevant demands, your network needs to be able to accommodate many different booking requests, increase user activity on your server, and store sensitive patient information. High-speed internet connections enhance your network performance and let you, your team, and your patients make the most of your uninterrupted uptime. Fiber-optic networks, when combined with load balancing and proper segmentation, can diffuse and direct network traffic efficiency and prevent congestion, which prevents downtime due to overload. Implementing Network Monitoring and Management Tools Much like your patients visit your practice to ensure everything is all right with the current state of their health, your network must also receive the same treatment. Identifying and pre-emptively resolving potential issues and vulnerabilities will prevent much more destructive or expensive problems from occurring. Use real-time tools to monitor your bandwidth usage and gain visibility of potential bottlenecks. Tools that offer risk monitoring deliver alerts about critical events that pose a threat to your business continuity. Your IT team will be better equipped to troubleshoot issues promptly and optimize performance. Conducting Regular Network Assessments and Audits Once you have the proper monitoring tools to manage your network topology better, proactive troubleshooting is a great way to spot-check whether your current solution is working as it should. A network audit is much like proactive troubleshooting; you are looking to see if anything could harm the overall system and catch it before it can develop. When auditing a network, the primary focus should be security measures. If patient and confidential data is not secure, the smooth operations of your business are the least of your worries. When conducting an audit, consulting with a network service provider will help identify issues with your protocols, data encryption, and firewall configuration. Establishing Redundancy and Disaster Recovery Plans Backing up private and confidential data is crucial to ensuring that sensitive information is not lost or exposed. Minimizing network downtime can often be achieved by having backup systems that will keep running in the event of an attack or outage. For example, a dedicated Cloud Access Network, power supplies, and switches will go a long way. When creating an internet contingency plan, outline steps and protocols with your team that you will take in the event of a complete failure, including things such as brand reputation management, customer service, and data loss prevention. Looking Forward As the lines between in-person and digital are blurred, navigating the complexities of implementing a robust network is paramount to your business. Strengthening your infrastructure, integrating redundant systems, and conducting regular audits and assessments with the proper monitoring and management tools will help you maximize uptime usage and minimize network downtime. Although overwhelming, working with a reputable network service provider can help you embrace your network topology to remain competitive.

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Digital Healthcare

The Key Ingredient in Healthcare Compliance Success

Article | November 29, 2023

The healthcare industry has become a prime target for cybercriminals in recent times. According to The State of Ransomware in Healthcare 2023 report from Sophos, six in 10 healthcare organizations have been hit by ransomware in the last 12 months, up from 34% in 2021. Among this uptick have been several headline-grabbing attacks. For example, Shields Health Care Group became the subject of the single-largest breach affecting any organization globally in April 2023, when 2.3 million patients of the Massachusetts-based medical services provider had their personal data stolen after a cybercriminal gained unauthorized access to the organization’s systems. Meanwhile, in the UK, a ransomware attack on the University of Manchester occurred in June, affecting an NHS patient data set holding information on 1.1 million patients across 200 hospitals. Critically, the wealth of data housed in healthcare networks, and the potential impact of data unavailability in healthcare, make the industry both attractive and lucrative to threat actors. It’s no coincidence that the Sophos report shows the rate of encryption in the healthcare sector is at its highest level in recent years. Of those healthcare organizations which suffered a ransomware attack in 2023, 73% had their data encrypted – up from 61% in 2022. When cybercriminals can successfully take down hospital systems and/or encrypt patient data so it can’t be used, they can blackmail health service providers, demanding significant sums before reinstating systems and/or data availability. Considering healthcare's critical role as the highest-stake industry in our society, where people's lives depend on its success, the likelihood of attackers achieving their goals is greater than in other sectors, as confirmed by the Sophos report. Indeed, of the 73% of healthcare organizations that had their data encrypted, 42% reported that they paid the requested ransom to recover data. DSPT and the compliance burden Without question, the security-related challenges in healthcare are mounting. Right now, industry organizations are operating against a backdrop of unprecedented operational and workforce pressures, spiralling demand for care and industrial action. Moreover, there is a growing regulatory burden, with organizations continually asked to comply with evolving cybersecurity rules, battling with multiple compliance mandates at any given time. Take the NHS as an example. According to the 2023 NHS Providers’ Regulation Survey, just over half (52%) of respondents said the regulatory burden on their trust had increased. And this is expected to ramp up further in the future, with the UK government setting out a new 2030 strategy aimed at bolstering cyber resilience in healthcare. Among the compliance burdens that the NHS faces is the challenge of meeting the requirements of the newly updated Data Security and Protection Toolkit (DSPT). Mandated to minimize cyber risks and enable healthcare providers to maintain a robust information security posture, the DSPT is not a simple checklist of security controls, but a comprehensive toolkit to evaluate current security maturity and establish a risk management programme. Indeed, in more recent times, DSPT has moved away from being a guide for achieving certain levels of assurance, and toward a mandatory evidence-based system which demands NHS organizations align with 10 precise National Data Guardian (NDG) standards: 1. The organization assures good management and maintenance of identity and access control for its networks and information systems. 2. The organization closely manages privileged user access to networks and information systems supporting essential services. 3. The organization ensures passwords are suitable for the information being protected. 4. Process reviews are held at least once a year where data security is put at risk and following security incidents. 5. Action is taken to address problems as a result of feedback at meetings. 6. All user devices are subject to anti-virus protections, while email services benefit from spam filtering and protection deployed at the corporate gateway. 7. Action is taken on known vulnerabilities based on advice from NHS Digital, and lessons are learned from previous incidents and near misses. 8. The organization has a defined, planned and communicated response to data security incidents impacting sensitive information or key operational services. 9. The organization has demonstrable confidence in the effectiveness of the security of technology, people, and processes relevant to essential services. 10. The organization securely configures the network and information systems that support the delivery of essential services. Reducing Compliance Challenges with the Right Solutions Taken individually, these standards may not seem too strenuous to adhere to. However, to be compliant with DSPT, all 10 items need to be completed and deemed ‘satisfactory’. To tick all 10 key boxes in the most effective and efficient manner simultaneously, organizations should consider their strategy carefully. This could involve embracing supportive tools to accelerate and enhance their compliance journey. Boiled down, DSPT demands several key things, including unincumbered visibility of the entire ecosystem, as well as the ability to demonstrate secure access, logs and storage, and essential auditing processes to maintain data security. Achieving these things might appear complicated, even daunting. However, there are solutions known as Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) systems on the market that can make achieving these capabilities, and in turn DSPT compliance, easy. Here, we outline some of the key features to look out for to meet compliance: • Log retention: A modern SIEM should be able to provide a centralized log storage and big data platform that scales to any organization’s size. Platforms should be able to provide role-based access to log data, including ‘data privacy’ functionality that can mask sensitive data until approved. Log data should not be modified or removed by users once ingested into the platform, while all data held should also be indexed and fully searchable. • Identifying and disabling unnecessary accounts: A good SIEM will also provide account auditing facilities for Active Directory that allow administrators to quickly identify dormant accounts. They should also be able to remove privileged user access when no longer required or appropriate. More sophisticated platforms will be able to do this in an automated manner. • Easy identification of issues: Clear and easily readable dashboards, alerts and reports for user logging activity should be provided, including failed login, apparent brute-force attempts, and bad password management practices. Further, those using machine learning will be able to identify unusual behavior patterns based on a baseline of activities of users and their peer group. • Integrate with third-party threat feeds: It will also be able to integrate with a wide variety of third-party threat feeds that provide information about specific known threat payloads/hashes and destination domains/addresses. Meeting the mandate Of course, having the right features in place is only part of the puzzle. For organizations to be truly successful in embracing tools that enable them to meet DSPT compliance more effectively, they should work to ensure that solutions providers offer them ongoing support – both in terms of ease of deployment and to ensure that they are using key systems in an optimal manner. Scalability is another important aspect to consider. Systems should be able to scale and continue to support the organization as data volumes increase and become more complex over time. In respect of scalability, organizations should take time to think about pricing models, ensuring that these are based on the number of devices (nodes). In doing so, it will become easier to accurately budget future costs, as well as provide greater budgeting certainty over the short, medium and longer term. A converged SIEM allows organizations to prioritize the big picture over individual tools, enabling them to develop a seamless and easy to use security operations setup. Not only does this approach boost cost transparency and eliminate potential complexities with managing a variety of siloed products – equally, it reduces the burdens on security teams, eliminating complexities over system integration and enhancing performance. A converged SIEM combines key technologies easily to offer improved security outcomes. In doing so, organizations can easily home in on specific standards and adopt security best practices while reducing the burden on security teams tasked with meeting DSPT compliance.

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Health Technology, Medical Devices

Maximizing Efficiency in Hospital Management Systems with EMRs

Article | May 22, 2023

EMRs have transformed how healthcare organizations handle patient data, improving efficiency and reducing errors. Hospitals can utilize them to enhance patient care and optimize management processes. Contents 1. Understanding Hospital EMR Systems 1.1 EHRs vs. EMRs 2.Role of EMR in Improving Hospital Management System 3. Resolving Challenges in EMR Implementation 4. Revolutionizing HMS with Next-Gen EMR Innovations 5. Key Takeaways 1. Understanding Hospital EMR Systems Electronic medical records (EMR) systems in hospitals, as digital adaptations of traditional paper charts, have become an integral part of modern healthcare. They encompass vital patient information, such as diagnoses, medical histories, lab results, medications, and physicians' notes. These systems enhance workflow efficiency by streamlining clinical processes, reducing manual tasks, and facilitating quick access to patient data. By eliminating paperwork and manual searching, EMR hospital software saves valuable time and allows healthcare providers to focus more on patient care. With improved access to comprehensive and accurate information, EMR systems contribute to enhanced patient care, treatment planning, and coordination among healthcare teams, ultimately leading to better outcomes for patients and healthcare institutions. 1.1 EHRs vs. EMRs Electronic medical records (EMRs) and electronic health records (EHRs) are two electronic systems used in modern healthcare to manage patients' medical information. While both aim to improve the quality of healthcare and patient safety, EMRs stand out for their ability to enhance workflow efficiency, improve patient care and safety, and offer better control over data security and privacy. Compared to EHRs, EMRs are more straightforward to use, less expensive, and do not require as much implementation complexity. Choosing between EMRs and EHRs ultimately depends on the specific functions that best serve the needs of the medical facility. Medical practitioners can find EMRs to be a compelling option due to their affordability and simplicity, as well as their ability to manage medical records securely and effectively. 2. Role of EMR in Improving Hospital Management System The Hospital Management System (HMS) covers three vital areas of hospital management, namely - Operations, Finance, and Clinical. The clinical aspect of the system includes EMR, which provides medical practitioners with a range of advantages, such as • EMRs facilitate quick transfer of patient information between different departments. • The digital record-keeping environment helps save a significant amount of space. • EMRs can help practitioners increase the number of patients they can see, leading to improved productivity and workflow. • Reduced errors in medical practice can result in better patient care and management of test results. • EMRs can reduce operational costs, especially in relation to overtime labor and transcription services. • EMRs can be customized and scaled to meet the specific needs of medical practice. • EMRs allow for advanced clinical documentation and e-prescribing. • EMRs enable more efficient and accurate billing processes for healthcare practices. In terms of benefits to patients, EMRs can improve the treatment and diagnosis of diseases,facilitate rapid decision-making and coordinate care among medical professionals assigned to individual patients,with a reduced likelihood of significant errors in a patient's health record. 3. Resolving Challenges in EMR Implementation EMR integration is vital as more healthcare organizations adopt hospital electronic medical records. However, the process can be time-consuming and challenging. Here, we will discuss the top six challenges of integrating EMRs as well as ways to overcome them Standardizing Data Formats Data compatibility is one of the primary challenges in integrating EMRs. The diverse formats in which various EMR systems store data can pose a significant hindrance to integration efforts. Addressing this obstacle requires identifying a viable approach for converting the data into a standardized format that is compatible with both systems. Coding Incompatibility Dealing with varying coding standards is another significant challenge that arises during EMR integration. The utilization of distinct coding standards across different EMR systems can pose a considerable challenge to the integration process. To overcome this hurdle, one must devise a solution to map the codes from one system to the codes in the other system. Data Security EMR integration raises significant security concerns that require attention. Securing the data and restricting access to only authorized users are critical aspects that necessitate appropriate security protocols. To ensure data safety and confidentiality, it is imperative to establish sound security measures. Maintaining Data Quality Integrating EMR systems carries a risk of data loss or corruption, making it crucial to prioritize data quality. To address this challenge, it is imperative to establish effective measures that ensure the accuracy and reliability of the data. Ensuring Optimal Functionality Following the integration of EMR systems, it is crucial to conduct rigorous testing and validation to ensure that the systems are functioning optimally. Despite the potential costs and time investments involved, it is necessary to prioritize this step to avoid complications and setbacks in the future. Cost Management Integrating EMR systems can be a significant financial undertaking, necessitating careful planning and budgeting. It is essential to factor in the costs of licenses, hardware, software, and services when embarking on an integration project. To address this challenge, one can explore cost-saving measures such as negotiating with vendors or implementing open-source software. 4. Revolutionizing HMS with Next-Gen EMR Innovations In the coming years, emerging trends in EMR are expected to have a significant impact on the hospital management system. It is crucial for hospital EMR management to keep a close eye on these developments and stay informed of the latest technological advancements to provide optimal care to their patients. Adapting to the evolving landscape and staying current with these changes will be essential for hospital management systems to continue providing high-quality care and remain competitive in the healthcare industry. Cloud Computing It refers to the instant digitization of medical records and easy access to them. It is a significant trend in the development of electronic medical records (EMR). However, there are challenges in transferring data between databases. It proves to be a boon when medical staff is scarce as it allows easy access to patient records. Moreover, Cloud Computing in EMR technology can provide healthcare providers with quick access to patient data, which can enable them to provide timely and appropriate care. RPA Robotic Process Automation (RPA) refers to the computerization and digitization of data. In the healthcare industry, RPA can alleviate the burden of manual labor and provide more precise and reliable data. Sophisticated software and techniques are utilized to derive this data, addressing the problem of inefficiency in EMR without necessitating a complete overhaul of the system. RPA is also a time-saving process that enables medical staff to allocate their time more effectively to crucial tasks. Additionally, RPA can reduce the need for manual labor, resulting in cost savings. Revamping EMR with IoT, AI & Voice Recognition The integration of IoT, artificial intelligence, and voice recognition in healthcare has significantly aided in the development of EMR. This combination has the potential to transform the healthcare industry by providing precise and swift data, which could prove critical in saving numerous lives. By combining these three technologies, more accurate data can be obtained, further enhancing patient care. Big Data and 6G Networking for Healthcare Analysis Big data analysis helps generate medical records by collecting and analyzing data from multiple sources. This approach provides precise insights that benefit both patients and medical professionals. The sixth-generation network, currently in development, has the potential to transform healthcare. By improving the speed of data transfer and communication between remote locations, this new network will facilitate the digitization of medical records and lead to the development of improved EHR and EMR systems. Wearable Devices for Better Patient Monitoring Various wearables with sensors can monitor patients' daily activities and later be integrated with EMRs for better healthcare. The wearables track patients' medical activities and vitals like heart rate and temperature. Integrating these wearables with EMRs provides timely information to healthcare centers, leading to improved care and treatment. 5. Key Takeaways EMRs have the potential to revolutionize the healthcare industry by enhancing patient care quality, productivity, and outcomes. However, implementing EMRs entails significant changes that require strong leadership support, dedicated physician champions, efficient training and optimization, and flexibility from the implementation team. Targeted training and support for specific components of the EMR system, such as patient portals and documentation tools, can help users adopt the system more efficiently and reduce the impact on productivity. By following a well-planned implementation strategy, healthcare organizations can harness the benefits of EMRs while minimizing disruption to their operations. Overall, EMRs offer solutions that create a secure and efficient platform for healthcare facilities and patients, helping to promote better connectivity and healthier lifestyles. The demand for EMR systems is pressing and vital in the current scenario, as the developments in the EMR industry indicate that they will play a critical role in revolutionizing the medical sector.

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Spotlight

DB Healthcare, Inc. and DB Blockchain

DB Healthcare provides staffing and consulting services in the area of Healthcare Information Technology. DB Healthcare services help you achieve your clinical and business goals by integrating information technology and people during project implementation, transformation and on-going support. DB Healthcare received gold seal of approval from The Joint Commission.

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