A 10-minute scan could soon let men know whether they're likely to develop prostate cancer

Men could soon be offered a new one-off prostate cancer test, which could detect whether they are likely to develop a dangerous form of the disease, scientists have revealed.
Experts say men could be offered one scan between the age of 55 and 60 and be given peace of mind for the rest of their life.The 10-minute scan, which could be potentially rolled out in supermarkets and shopping centres, detects dangerous cancers years before they cause any harm while ignoring growths that dont pose a threat.

Spotlight

APPI Health Group

The APPI has enjoyed immense success with training Physiotherapists and equivalent degree therapists in the APPI Pilates method. Our success relies on our research based approach to Pilates training. As physiotherapists, we recognise the demand for more specific Pilates training which targets the higher theoretical and practical experience of higher degree therapists. The APPI method presents the most current research relevant to Pilates and teaches a realistic framework of exercises to apply in the clinical setting.

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Healthtech Security

The Long-Term Care Software: Mapping the Future

Article | August 31, 2023

Long-term care comprises all the health services that help patients with chronic illnesses or disabilities meet their medical and non-medical needs. It caters to those who cannot care for themselves for extended durations. For care providers, it becomes critical to meet the needs of patients on time while delivering top-notch quality, especially at a time when virtual care is more important than ever. To remedy this, many of the tasks and processes within long-term care are supported by digital solutions. These long-term care software applications enable care providers to automate aspects of patient scheduling, inventory control, regulation and compliance, data management, care delivery management, and much more. Some of the end users of long-term care software include home healthcare agencies, nursing homes, and residential hospice care facilities. What is Driving the Growth of Long-Term Care Solutions? Digitalization has swept the healthcare industry, and medical technology now occupies a significant area of medical care delivery. With the demand for a robust healthcare infrastructure aggravated by a shortage of medical professionals, the need for automation is driving the growth of medtech across all areas of healthcare. In addition, fewer medical specialists and medical cost reduction initiatives combined are powering the long-term care software market’s growth. Challenges for the Long-Term Care Software Market Despite the rapid growth in the use of digital solutions to manage administrative and compliance tasks, technological transformations are expensive. The high maintenance costs incurred by care providers are a major hindrance towards a full-fledged adoption. Many care providers are also unwilling to adopt new applications due to the implementation and staff training costs involved in doing so. What the Future Holds? With an increase in remote care and the use of technologies like the Internet of Medical Things to deliver diagnostic services and preventive care, medtech is witnessing a revolution. Long-term care is bound to follow suit thanks to areas like remote patient monitoring and wearable technology. While the long-term care market is slated to grow by leaps and bounds, solution makers must find a way to help care providers warm up to the use of technology and de

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

4 trends that are shaping product management in health care

Article | September 7, 2023

“Health care is different, the data here is emotional! If you tell me you were buying a fishing rod online and were emotional about it, I’d say you are lying. But I do frequently see people helpless and confused when it comes to receiving health care, managing its costs, making sense of its data.”  - Senior Product Leader inOptum Global Solutions Pvt. Ltd. Yes, health care is different, and so is product management in it. This piece highlights the top 4 product management trends that are specific to health care and serve beyond being just a list of technologies making their way into health care. Health care consumerism Lance broke his ankle in a bicycle accident and is now in hospital waiting for surgery. Which of these words would describe him more aptly— a ‘patient’ or a ‘health care consumer’? The fact that Lance holds a high-deductible health plan, manages an interactive relationship with his primary doctor, keenly monitors his fitness through his smartwatch, and learns about healthier diet plans and recipes online — I can say he isn’t just receiving health care, but making active choices on how to pay for and manage his health. This choice and responsibility that people demand, is ‘health care consumerism’. This trend has been growing since 2015 when value-based care started picking up in the US. What does this imply for products/PMs? These are challenging and exciting times to be a product manager (PM) in health tech. This is because people are now demanding an experience equivalent to what they’re used to from other products in their lives, such as e-commerce, streaming platforms, and digital payments, to name a few. Any consumer-facing product (a mobile app, a web-based patient portal, a tech-enabled service) needs to meet high expectations. Flexible employer-sponsored health plans options, health reimbursement arrangements, price transparency products for drugs and medical expenses, remote health care services, and government's push to strengthen data and privacy rights — all point to opportunities for building innovative products with ‘health care consumerism’ as a key product philosophy. Wellness COVID-19 has tested health care systems to their limits. In most countries, these systems failed disastrously in providing adequate, timely medical assistance to many infected people. Prevention is of course better than cure, but people were now forced to learn it the hard way when cure became both inaccessible and uncertain. With lockdowns and social isolation, prevention, fitness, diet, and mental wellbeing all took center stage. Wellness means taking a ‘whole-person approach’ to health care — one where people recognize the need to improve and sustain health, not only when they are unwell, but also when they’re making health care decisions that concern their long-term physical and mental health. A McKinsey study notes that consumers look at wellness from 6 dimensions beyond sick-care— health, fitness, nutrition, appearance, sleep, and mindfulness. Most countries in the study show that wellness has gained priority by at least 35% in the last 2–3 years. And wellness services like nutritionists, care managers, fitness training, psychotherapy consultants contribute 30% of the overall wellness spend. So, what do health-tech PMs need to remember about wellness? The first principle is, “Move to care out of the hospital, and into people’s homes”. A patient discharged after knee surgery has high chance of getting readmitted if he/she has high risk of falling in his/her house, or is unable to afford post-discharge at-home care with a physiotherapist. This leads us PMs to build products that recognize every person’s social determinants of health and create support systems that consider care at the hospital and care at home as a continuum. The second principle is, “Don’t be limited by a narrow view of ‘what business we are in’, as wellness is broad, and as a health tech company, we are in health-care, not sick-care”. Wellness products and services include — fitness and nutrition apps, medical devices, telemedicine, sleep trackers, wellness-oriented apparel, beauty products, and meditation-oriented offerings, to name just a few. Recent regulations in many countries require health care providers to treat behavioural health services at par with treating for physical conditions, and this is just a start. Equitable AI Last month, WHO released a report titled “Ethics and Governance of Artificial Intelligence for Health”. The report cautions researchers and health tech companies to never design AI algorithms with a single population in mind. One example I read was, “AI systems that are primarily trained on data collected from patients in high-income settings will not perform as effectively for individuals in low or middle-income communities.” During COVID-19, we came across countless studies that talked about the disproportionate impact on minorities in terms of infections, hospitalizations, and mortality. A student at MIT discovered that a popular out-of-the-box AI algorithm that projects patient mortality for those admitted in hospitals, makes significantly different predictions based on race — and this may have adversely moved hospital resources away from some patients who had higher risks of mortality. How should I think about health equity as an AI health-tech PM? Health equity means that everyone should have a fair chance at being healthy. As a PM, it’s my job to make sure that every AI-assisted feature in my product is crafted to be re-iterative and inclusive, to serve any community or subpopulation, and is validated across many geographies. To prevent any inequitable AI from getting shipped, it is important to ensure that the underlying AI model is transparent and intelligible. This means knowing what data goes into it, how it learns, which features does it weigh over others, and how does the model handles unique features that characterize minorities. Integrated and interoperable In every article that I read on topics such as digital platforms, SaaS, or connectivity with EMRs, I always find the words: ‘integrated’ and ‘interoperable’ therein. Most large and conventional health tech companies started by offering point-solutions that were often inextensible, monolithic, and worked with isolated on-prem servers and databases. To give a consistent user experience, leverage economies of scope, and scale products to meet other needs of their customers, started an exodus from fragmented point-solutions to interoperable, integrated solutions. The popularization of service-oriented architectures (SOAs) and cloud vendors like AWS, Azure, and GCP has also helped. The what and how of integrated-interoperable solutions for PMs: Integrated solutions (IS), as I see them, are of two kinds — one, in which as a health tech company, we help our customers (health systems, insurance companies, direct to consumers) accomplish not just one, but most/all tasks in a business process. For example, a B2B IS in value-based care contract management would mean that we help our customers and health systems by giving an end-to-end solution that helps them enter into, negotiate, plan for, manage, get payments for their value-based contracts with health plans. In the second type of IS, we offer products that can be easily customized to different types of customers. For example, a health management app that people can subscribe to for different programs such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol management, as needed. The app works with different datasets for these programs and uses different analyses and clinical repositories in its backend, but still delivers a consistent user experience across programs to a user who enrolled in multiple programs, say diabetes and weight management. ‘Interoperable’ simply means that one product should be able to talk to other products both in and out of the company. For example, if product-A can alert a doctor about any drug-drug interactions or allergies a patient might have, while she is writing prescriptions for the patient in product-B (an EMR), then product-A does talk to product-B, and hence, is interoperable. This trend is picking up further with the growth of IoT devices, and industry-wide participation in adopting common standards for data exchange. Conclusion Though the article derives much of its context from US health care, I have tried to keep a global lens while choosing these topics. For developing economies like India, digitization is the number one trend as much of the health system is still moving from manual records to digitally store patient and medical data in EMRs. The good news is that India is booming with health-tech innovation and that is where consumerism, wellness, and equitable AI make sense. Once companies develop enough point-solutions for different health system needs and use-cases, Indian health tech will see a move towards creating integrated, interoperable (IGIO) systems as well. There are some other trends such as — use of non-AI emerging tech such as Blockchain in health information management, cloud infrastructure for health tech innovation, big data and analytics to improve operational efficiency in areas such as claims management and compliance reporting, Agile product management for co-developing with and continuously delivering to clients etc. — but I see them either as too nascent, or too old to feature in this list. Finally, as a health tech product manager, you can use the following questions to assess your products against the above trends — (Consumerism) do the products that I manage, empower consumers with choice, information, and actionability? (Wellness) Does my product emphasize keeping them out-of-hospitals and healthy in the first place? (Equitable AI) Am I sure that my product doesn’t discriminate against individuals belonging to underserved populations? (IGIO) And finally, is my product scalable, integrated and interoperable to expand to a platform, in the true sense?

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Health Technology, Digital Healthcare

Amazon Care: Revolutionizing Virtual Care

Article | September 8, 2023

In 2021, the introduction of Amazon Care marked the first time a prominent technology firm stepped into the healthcare services industry. The fact that Amazon filed paperwork to offer care in multiple states without much fanfare is intriguing. In March 2021, the company confirmed the details of its new services, announcing that it would be delivering the services through an independent private medical practice called Care Medical. The move may signify another diversification for Amazon, but what does it mean for the healthcare services landscape? The Highlights of Amazon Care’s Services Home healthcare Amazon announced that it would be participating in an advocacy group for home healthcare. The Moving Health at Home initiative aims to transform how policymakers view the home as a site to deliver clinical services. Amazon Care may be riding on the trend for home care that has been evolving in the form of remote patient monitoring for post-acute care management and chronic care. Employer-oriented offering Amazon Care aims to become a workplace benefit partner for employers. One of the pain points it is directly addressing is the challenge of runaway inflation that increases healthcare costs. Virtual care simplified The most significant offering that Amazon Care plans to lead with is virtual care that promises to reduce wait times for quality patient care to under 60 seconds. It also includes the option to access 24-hour care services through messaging and video calling. In addition, it eliminates unnecessary traveling and long wait times by delivering care in the comfort of the patient’s home. The Path Ahead Amazon is known for introducing a slew of initiatives in the health and fitness sector, like the Halo wearables, a data management product called Amazon Health Lake, and a healthcare delivery system called Haven, which doubled over in 2021 after a three-year run. However, the tech juggernaut is not about to stop attempting to disrupt healthcare services. Only time will tell whether Amazon Care finally proves to be a feather in Amazon’s healthcare cap or another ambitious project that bites the dust.

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5 Healthcare Tech Trends Worth Keeping an Eye On

Article | April 16, 2020

The healthcare industry is experiencing rapid shifts. Some of this is due to the current pandemic, but much of this evolution was happening even before the COVID-19 outbreak. Understanding and embracing the introduction of new technology into the market will be important for healthcare professionals and patients alike. Here are some of the trends worth keeping tabs on:

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Spotlight

APPI Health Group

The APPI has enjoyed immense success with training Physiotherapists and equivalent degree therapists in the APPI Pilates method. Our success relies on our research based approach to Pilates training. As physiotherapists, we recognise the demand for more specific Pilates training which targets the higher theoretical and practical experience of higher degree therapists. The APPI method presents the most current research relevant to Pilates and teaches a realistic framework of exercises to apply in the clinical setting.

Related News

2020 Elections Healthcare Debate Truths, Half-Truths, And Falsehoods

forbes.com | July 08, 2019

Healthcare may emerge as the number one issue in the 2020 election. In itself this isnt surprising, given that for many decades the electorate has considered healthcare a key issue.And, the truth is healthcare access continues to be a major problem in the U.S., along with inequalities in outcomes, relatively high prices for healthcare services, and high out-of-pocket spending. Democratic presidential candidates have weighed in on these issues.Without more clarity, however, the debate runs the risk of unraveling into exercises in sophistry.Politicians in America have had a knack for telling half-truths or even untruths about healthcare. For example, in 2012, John Boehner claimed that the U.S. has the best healthcare delivery system in the world. And, just prior to signing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law, President Obamastated if you like your healthcare plan, you can keep it.

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Adelaide IT services provider Chamonix lands $8 million govt healthcare software deal

Nico Arboleda | July 08, 2019

Adelaide-based IT services provider Chamonix IT Management Consulting has scored an $8 million contract with the Australian Digital Health Agency (ADHA).The contract is to develop and support a Health Identifier and PCEHR System HIPS, and a PCHER is a Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record.HIPS is a My Health Record (MHR) integration software that is owned by ADHA. The software is used by hospitals and private diagnostic providers to connect to the national My Health Record infrastructure.An ADHA spokesperson told CRN that Chamonix was picked out from an open tender process.Chamonix was founded in 2010 in Adelaide and was a CRN Fast50 lister in 2014 due to its work with Microsoft, achieving Gold Partner status in 2012. The company also has an office in Brisbane, which opened in 2016.

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3 exciting small cap ASX healthcare shares to watch in FY203 exciting small cap ASX healthcare shares to watch in FY20

Unified Health care Home Healthcare COPD | July 08, 2019

Because of positive tailwinds such as ageing populations, increased chronic disease burden, and better technologies, I believe demand for healthcare services will grow strongly over the next decade. In light of this, I think the healthcare sector could be a great place to look for small cap shares to buy and hold.Three growing healthcare shares that I think are worth looking closely at are listed below. Heres why I like them. Alcidion is an informatics solutions provider which develops and sells healthcare analytics software for hospitals and other healthcare providers. This software aims to improve the efficacy and cost of delivering services to patients and reduce hospital-acquired complications. Earlier this year the company won its first major contract with the Dartford and Gravesham National Health Service (NHS) Trust in the United Kingdom. Given how the NHS is currently transitioning to a paperless environment, I wouldnt be surprised to see more and more large contracts being won over the coming 12 months.

Read More

2020 Elections Healthcare Debate Truths, Half-Truths, And Falsehoods

forbes.com | July 08, 2019

Healthcare may emerge as the number one issue in the 2020 election. In itself this isnt surprising, given that for many decades the electorate has considered healthcare a key issue.And, the truth is healthcare access continues to be a major problem in the U.S., along with inequalities in outcomes, relatively high prices for healthcare services, and high out-of-pocket spending. Democratic presidential candidates have weighed in on these issues.Without more clarity, however, the debate runs the risk of unraveling into exercises in sophistry.Politicians in America have had a knack for telling half-truths or even untruths about healthcare. For example, in 2012, John Boehner claimed that the U.S. has the best healthcare delivery system in the world. And, just prior to signing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law, President Obamastated if you like your healthcare plan, you can keep it.

Read More

Adelaide IT services provider Chamonix lands $8 million govt healthcare software deal

Nico Arboleda | July 08, 2019

Adelaide-based IT services provider Chamonix IT Management Consulting has scored an $8 million contract with the Australian Digital Health Agency (ADHA).The contract is to develop and support a Health Identifier and PCEHR System HIPS, and a PCHER is a Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record.HIPS is a My Health Record (MHR) integration software that is owned by ADHA. The software is used by hospitals and private diagnostic providers to connect to the national My Health Record infrastructure.An ADHA spokesperson told CRN that Chamonix was picked out from an open tender process.Chamonix was founded in 2010 in Adelaide and was a CRN Fast50 lister in 2014 due to its work with Microsoft, achieving Gold Partner status in 2012. The company also has an office in Brisbane, which opened in 2016.

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3 exciting small cap ASX healthcare shares to watch in FY203 exciting small cap ASX healthcare shares to watch in FY20

Unified Health care Home Healthcare COPD | July 08, 2019

Because of positive tailwinds such as ageing populations, increased chronic disease burden, and better technologies, I believe demand for healthcare services will grow strongly over the next decade. In light of this, I think the healthcare sector could be a great place to look for small cap shares to buy and hold.Three growing healthcare shares that I think are worth looking closely at are listed below. Heres why I like them. Alcidion is an informatics solutions provider which develops and sells healthcare analytics software for hospitals and other healthcare providers. This software aims to improve the efficacy and cost of delivering services to patients and reduce hospital-acquired complications. Earlier this year the company won its first major contract with the Dartford and Gravesham National Health Service (NHS) Trust in the United Kingdom. Given how the NHS is currently transitioning to a paperless environment, I wouldnt be surprised to see more and more large contracts being won over the coming 12 months.

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