5 Reasons Why Electronic Health Records are Better than Paper Records

| January 15, 2020

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By now, leadership in your medical organization is starting to conclude that there are more problems than benefits in continuing to use using paper-based records and it is time to make the switch to electronic health records. While some practices can manage to get by using old-fashioned paper, the drawbacks can no longer be ignored. Paper records are simply too insecure and it is becoming increasingly difficult to justify using this outdated method of maintaining patient files. In fact, using an electronic health record or EHR system offers you much better control over information security. To help you make the case to your team for going forward with an EHR, here are five reasons why electronic health records are more secure than paper records.

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HMS

HMS provides the broadest suite of healthcare cost containment solutions to help payers improve performance. We deliver coordination of benefits, payment integrity, and data solutions to state agencies, federal programs, health plans, and employers. We offer scalable services — from supplemental to full outsourcing. Using innovative technology through powerful data services and analytics, we prevent improper payments related to fraud, waste, and abuse; and recover on inappropriately paid claims. As a result of our services, customers recover billions of dollars every year and save billions more through the prevention of erroneous payments.

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Spotlight

HMS

HMS provides the broadest suite of healthcare cost containment solutions to help payers improve performance. We deliver coordination of benefits, payment integrity, and data solutions to state agencies, federal programs, health plans, and employers. We offer scalable services — from supplemental to full outsourcing. Using innovative technology through powerful data services and analytics, we prevent improper payments related to fraud, waste, and abuse; and recover on inappropriately paid claims. As a result of our services, customers recover billions of dollars every year and save billions more through the prevention of erroneous payments.

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