Networked medical device cybersecurity and patient safety

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In a December 2012 episode of the popular television series Homeland,  the Vice President of the United States was assassinated when a terrorist organization wirelessly hacked his pacemaker. While this scenario may seem far-fetched, recent compelling demonstrations of networked medical devices vulnerabilities and the potential for intentional threats for example, insulin-pump hack highlight concerns about cybersecurity threats to networked medical devices. Hundreds of thousands of medical devices such as patient monitors, infusion pumps, ventilators, and imaging modalities – many of which are life-sustaining or life-supporting – currently reside on hospital networks across the United States.

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Lexington Medical Center's network of care includes a 428-bed hospital, six community medical centers, the largest nursing home in the Carolinas, occupational health, an Alzheimer's care facility, and 60 physician practices.

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Article | April 2, 2020

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Spotlight

Lexington Medical Center

Lexington Medical Center's network of care includes a 428-bed hospital, six community medical centers, the largest nursing home in the Carolinas, occupational health, an Alzheimer's care facility, and 60 physician practices.

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