Navigating the Telehealth Landscape

Melanie matthews | August 13, 2018

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As healthcare organizations move from fee-for-service to value-based care, telehealth can enable the delivery of medicine at every point in the care continuum, according to a new infographic by InTouch Health. The infographic provides a roadmap to help navigate the telehealth landscape.

Spotlight

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

"The mission of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is to provide expert, compassionate care to children and adults with cancer while advancing the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, cure, and prevention of cancer and related diseases. As an affiliate of Harvard Medical School and a Comprehensive Cancer Center designated by the National Cancer Institute, the Institute also provides training for new generations of physicians and scientists, designs programs that promote public health particularly among high-risk and underserved populations, and disseminates innovative patient therapies and scientific discoveries to our target community across the United States and throughout the world. The Jimmy Fund is the principal charity of the Institute. The Boston Red Sox adopted the Jimmy Fund as its official charity in 1953 and continues to prominently sponsor the charity."

OTHER ARTICLES

IMMERSIVE ENVIRONMENTS COULD BE THE NUDGE WE"RE ALL LOOKING FOR WHEN IT COMES TO FRAMING BEHAVIORAL FRAMEWORKS...

Article | December 21, 2020

Yes, empathy has become a fad. Connecting to another human is actually something cool kids do now. If a brand doesn’t have an impact model that includes a practical social issue, consumers tend to not take that brand seriously. In this case, empathy needs to be revisited beyond the trend itself for these strategies to have real, lasting impact. Practical strategies around compassion meanwhile have similarly become an intrinsic part of social impact organisations. They have become so commonplace that prosocial behaviour has strayed into a kind of tokenism. It is common for instance for consumers to donate their hard-earned money to companies who focus their energies on trying to alleviate real-world issues. The question then is whether this proxy for compassion isn’t in fact watering down human connections, as well as our positive impact on the issues business and organisations seek to solve with our help. Postmodern behavioral science If it is, then we must understand why and how to change that. This is where postmodern behavioral science provides a possible better alternative to social impact strategies. Postmodern behavioral science suggests that the current approach to understanding human behaviour lacks even a rudimentary understanding of empathy, defined in the area of social impact as a discursive strategy that allows us to feel what the group we are trying to help is feeling. Of course, compassion has very close ties with empathy. Empathy is an innate ability we all have, one that we can learn to develop and fine-tune over time. It is our emotional connection to another human, though one that lies beyond our own ego. It takes the perspective of the person who is struggling and seeks to understand their life, their struggle, and their worldview. It also resolves to value and validate their perspective and experience — something that donating money to a social impact cause does not. In its broader definition, empathy is a shared interpersonal experience which is implicated in many aspects of social cognition, notably prosocial behavior, morality, and the regulation of aggression. Empathy has a host of positive after-effects when applied as an interpersonal experience. If a social impact organisation is preoccupied with raising capital, then it is likely to disregard the practical worth of empathy for those who truly want to achieve its mission. Immersive empathy One way that behavioral science can contribute is to utilise tools that can help augment the experience of those in need for those needing to understand those needs. Both AR and VR can help people visualise and follow the stories of those who require compassion. These create virtual environments for partners, governments, and consumers to experience with the people they seek to help. But of course, much of human behaviour is geared toward seeking pleasant experiences and avoiding unnecessary pain. Our in-built hedonic valuation systems guide decisions towards and away from experiences according to our survival instincts. This is precisely why business owners who want to encourage empathy in their customers go the easy route, but should seek a more participatory frameworks to inspire and provide experiences for those on board with a social mission. Then there are issues like financial literacy in underserved populations, access to clean water, education for women and girls, and environmental conservation, to name a few of the problems that social impact companies are attempting to tackle. If a company is trying to tackle an issue such as access to clean water, then rather than start there, it should first ask exactly how this issue arose and developed. It should question the beliefs that underpin this chronic social inequality, those that inform policies, practices, cultural taboos, and beliefs about water and people’s access to it. To simply respond to an issue in its developed form is to leave it unfixed. We must be willing to reverse engineer the origins of that issue that got us to where we are. In other words, human behaviour is not the only component to consider in this. The main behavioral framework public servants should take with them is to develop a nudge unit solely based on the relationship between behavioural science and technology. This is mainly because technology is an inevitable part of how we now relate to one another. Immersive Compassion meanwhile should embrace tools like AR/VR that seek to create empathetic environments and valuable impact longevity. To fully embrace empathy as an organisation is to create relevant and rigorous responses that go as far as to alter the infrastructure of its target goals. Optimising social impact comes down to optimising human experience.

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The Impact of COVID-19 on Health and Finance

Article | March 25, 2020

The new coronavirus has imminent and profound implications for health plans, benefit providers, health systems, and financial institutions. These constituents require a rapid strategic response as they brace for a landscape that is different from anything forecasts have offered to date. A digital workplace, interoperability, customer-centricity, and fraud prevention are just a few of the factors that will play a part in such a strategic response. Interoperability of disparate electronic medical records (EMR) systems is the promise and the bane of the healthcare industry. The fix is not quick or easy. But the current environment brings renewed purpose to those initiatives. Health plans and benefit providers have a pivotal role in managing public worries regarding testing and treatment for the new coronavirus as well as any underlying conditions that require medical treatment. While these organizations are likely to be in rapid-planning-and-response mode, member engagement must be part of that rapid planning and response. Some have already announced they will waive prior authorizations for COVID-19 tests or expand access to telehealth services, but that is only the tip of the iceberg of what member engagement can look like.

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Identity + RBAC Tighten Security in Healthcare

Article | March 6, 2020

As worries about coronavirus (also known as COVID-19) mount daily, healthcare and health care organizations work valiantly to deliver quality healthcare. Potential exposure of health care workers to COVID-19 risks further shortages of hospital staff and clinical service providers. This presents a security challenge in rapidly authorizing individuals to fill needed roles as they are temporarily vacated. Role-based access control (RBAC) has long been the standard many organizations adhere to when establishing security and limiting access to resources. In a rapidly changing environment RBAC alone falls short of meeting data privacy and security needs. Implementation of role-based access controls (RBAC) alone no longer aligns with the needs of modern healthcare or the incorporation of cloud software and ecosystems. RBAC indicates the use of static roles and groups to restrict access to sensitive data and critical systems with a set it and forget it mindset. In the past RBAC alone was sufficient, but cloud migration strategies and a fluid workforce require time-bound access to maintain proper governance. Healthcare organizations have a dynamic structure and must accommodate individuals working in varying shifts, multiple clinics, or research areas, which requires shifting permissions depending on their duties at a given time. RBAC alone simply cannot keep pace with modern healthcare security needs.

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Telehealth emerges as access tool in healthcare transformation

Article | March 11, 2020

Healthcare organizations are faced with addressing the “triple aim” of improving cost, quality and access to medical care. Telehealth has been seen as a tool to improve access with its convenience and availability with mobile apps or personal computers. Regulators are seeing the value of the technology with states loosening rules about the practice of telehealth and reimbursement improving, the American Telemedicine Association said. However, it will take some time for telehealth to reach its full potential to blend telehealth into current care processes. Right now, telehealth is separate from many of the healthcare workflows, which is keeping the technology from reaching its fullest potential – in terms of quality and patient experience. This can be overcome by addressing the economics, whether that is in health plan design and also how providers are compensated. Despite recent improvements in telehealth reimbursements, many of the payments are tied to in-person visits. Healthcare providers, payers and regulators need to figure out what treatments need to be reimbursed. Telemedicine, which involves clinician-to-clinician remote consults, is immensely important in emergency care and has shown a great deal of use in treating stroke, since not every facility has neurology covered around the clock. Certain medical specialties, such as psychiatry or dermatology, have a real opportunity to capitalize upon telehealth, as well as non-emergency, urgent care.

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Spotlight

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

"The mission of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is to provide expert, compassionate care to children and adults with cancer while advancing the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, cure, and prevention of cancer and related diseases. As an affiliate of Harvard Medical School and a Comprehensive Cancer Center designated by the National Cancer Institute, the Institute also provides training for new generations of physicians and scientists, designs programs that promote public health particularly among high-risk and underserved populations, and disseminates innovative patient therapies and scientific discoveries to our target community across the United States and throughout the world. The Jimmy Fund is the principal charity of the Institute. The Boston Red Sox adopted the Jimmy Fund as its official charity in 1953 and continues to prominently sponsor the charity."

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