Looking to Keep Data Analytics in Healthcare Affordable? The Answer is the Cloud

TOM SCOTT | February 17, 2020

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It’s clear that 2020 Healthcare will be the year of big market disruptions. With data-rich players such as Amazon and Google entering into the healthcare market space, many traditional health care systems are reviewing their own strategic plans with an eye towards staying relevant. According to a recent analytics survey by HIMSS, 32% of respondents said that population health is a top focus moving forward, and nearly 60% are eager to make improvements in care. Most traditional healthcare organizations recognize the importance data analytics play in better health management and patient outcomes, but many fall short in actively using these analytics to impact care. A 2019 poll found that 84% of healthcare executives believed analytics would be critical for success in the next three years, yet one out of every three of the healthcare organizations surveyed did not have a comprehensive strategy for analytics in place. Additionally, there is a huge potential to apply data analytics to areas beyond clinical care — a separate 2019 poll among health leaders found that while 90% of respondents report using data analytics in clinical areas, only 28% used analytics for effectiveness of care projects, only 22% were using it for population health, and a mere 11% were using it for chronic care management.

Spotlight

Lark Health

Lark Health is the leading chronic disease prevention and management platform using proven, AI health coaching to deliver better outcomes at scale. Lark uses cutting edge AI and connected health monitors, which can be combined with human coaches, to provide real-time, personalized, 24/7 support and counseling to help users make healthier choices and manage their conditions. Lark’s Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), Wellness Program, Diabetes Care Program, and Hypertension Program serve nearly 2 million users, and have demonstrated clinically validated outcomes published in 11 peer-reviewed journals and analyst reports.

OTHER ARTICLES

How COVID-19 Could Impact Digital Health

Article | April 1, 2020

As the world grapples with the tragic COVID-19 pandemic, it is tempting to imagine a post-COVID future that includes some silver linings. As terrible as the situation is today, maybe this calamity will at least lead to some lasting, positive changes, particularly in healthcare. Telemedicine has already emerged as the poster child for this line of thinking. Providers and patients have dramatically increased the use of telemedicine to ensure continued access to healthcare services while maintaining social distancing and respecting the enormous burden on our healthcare workers and facilities. Regulators and payers are encouraging and enabling this shift by temporarily relaxing policies that have limited telemedicine.

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The Value of an EHR Cloud Solution

Article | February 19, 2020

The term, “The Cloud,” has become so commonplace that one might ask: “What does it mean and what value can it bring to a healthcare organization’s electronic health record (EHR)?” Without getting too technical, Cloud is a model for delivering IT resources. According to the National Institute of Standards, “Cloud computing is a model for enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources … that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction.” That is a straightforward definition. There are in fact three service layers, five essential characteristics and four deployment models inherent to the definition. Most healthcare organizations would use the “Private” deployment model. Cloud is a natural evolution in computing brought about by evolving improvement in connectivity and data storage capabilities as a result of improvement in technology. Cloud computing is not new and has existed in many forms over the past 40 years. Remote job entry was the definition in the 1970s and in the 1990s it became “outsourced infrastructure.”

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What are the Risks of AI in the healthcare industry

Article | April 21, 2020

While artificial intelligence (AI) offers numerous advantages across a wide range of businesses and applications, an ongoing report spreads out some convincing focuses on the different difficulties and perils of using AI in the social insurance segment. As of late, AI has been progressively consolidated all through the medicinal services space. Machines would now be able to give emotional wellness help by means of a chatbot, screen tolerant wellbeing, and even anticipate heart failure, seizures, or sepsis.

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How Blockchain Technology Will Improve Mobile Healthcare

Article | March 27, 2020

The key concerns of healthcare management today are data processing and data security. Patients don’t have full ownership of their medical records, and are unable to control how their information is updated. There isn’t enough transparency to the process. There are also significant concerns related to data security, especially in the areas of personalized medicine and the rise of wearables. Patients and medical staff need secure and straightforward ways to record data, send it over networks, and receive advice without security concerns. Blockchain technology can help solve these problems. Introduced in 2008 as a means of recording cryptocurrency transactions, blockchain is a distributed cloud-based ledger that offers the ability to verify the origin of data and prevent breaches. When a user wants to make a transaction, they issue a request signed with their private key. The network verifies its authenticity by using a public key. If the verification is successful, the transaction is broadcast to the network and included in a block. The network of “miners” solves the block to get a reward, and once the block is revealed, it is added to the blockchain, making it permanent. It’s impossible to introduce new information in a block unnoticed, because that would change the structure of the entire chain. This feature makes the system safe and transparent.

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Spotlight

Lark Health

Lark Health is the leading chronic disease prevention and management platform using proven, AI health coaching to deliver better outcomes at scale. Lark uses cutting edge AI and connected health monitors, which can be combined with human coaches, to provide real-time, personalized, 24/7 support and counseling to help users make healthier choices and manage their conditions. Lark’s Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), Wellness Program, Diabetes Care Program, and Hypertension Program serve nearly 2 million users, and have demonstrated clinically validated outcomes published in 11 peer-reviewed journals and analyst reports.

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