Facts on Congenital Heart Disease

| September 28, 2016

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Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the number 1 birth defect. Every 15 minutes, a baby is born with CHD. If acritical CHD is not detected soon after birth, an infant can die. Thanks to improvements in diagnostic imaging and care, many congenital heart defects can be detected before ababy is born. But not always. The Children’s National Health System's Cardiology team created a Congenital Heart DiseaseScreening Program, promoting the use of pulse oximetry to detect critical CHDs soon after birth

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Region Skåne

Region Skåne, or Skåne Regional Council, is the self-governing authority of Skåne, the southernmost county of Sweden. Region Skåne has its head office in the city of Kristianstad and has work places in every municipality in Skåne.

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Region Skåne

Region Skåne, or Skåne Regional Council, is the self-governing authority of Skåne, the southernmost county of Sweden. Region Skåne has its head office in the city of Kristianstad and has work places in every municipality in Skåne.

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