BIG DATA MACRA AND EVIDENCE

| May 31, 2017

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As the shift toward value-based medicine continues, you as providers and health systems must determine how to scale the mountain that is Big Data. Summiting the peak means integrating the data such that it improves the patient experience of care, improves population health, and reduces cost (the Triple Aim). However, the path to the peak is treacherous and littered with barriers and unsure footing. Let us provide some guidance to get you safely to the top.

Spotlight

Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC)

Managed and operated by its customers, who are represented by 15 Alaska Native leaders from around the state, ANTHC is a not-for-profit health organization that provides statewide services in specialty medical care; operates the 150-bed, state-of-the-art Alaska Native Medical Center hospital; leads construction of water, sanitation and health facilities around Alaska; offers community health and research services; is at the forefront of innovative information technology; and offers professional recruiting to partners across the state. As a member of the Alaska Native Health Board, ANTHC works closely with the National Indian Health Board to address Alaska Native and American Indian health issues…

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Spotlight

Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC)

Managed and operated by its customers, who are represented by 15 Alaska Native leaders from around the state, ANTHC is a not-for-profit health organization that provides statewide services in specialty medical care; operates the 150-bed, state-of-the-art Alaska Native Medical Center hospital; leads construction of water, sanitation and health facilities around Alaska; offers community health and research services; is at the forefront of innovative information technology; and offers professional recruiting to partners across the state. As a member of the Alaska Native Health Board, ANTHC works closely with the National Indian Health Board to address Alaska Native and American Indian health issues…

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