An OMA-Ministry Deal Won't Fix Ontario Health Care, But This Might

| July 19, 2016

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On July 11, 2016 the Ontario Medical Association (OMA) announced a tentative agreement with the Ministry of Health (MOH). Immediately we heard opinions against and in favour of the deal. On a backdrop of mistrust, accumulated over years of disagreements and a recent history of unilateral cuts (ranging from a five to 30 per cent decrease in income depending on the specialty), tensions are rising. With an upcoming referendum on this agreement, serious discussions about the future of health care in Ontario need to happen. As a new graduate in family medicine, poised to start my own practice in a few short weeks, here's my attempt to make some sense of what is going on.

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Boston Medical Center (BMC)

Boston Medical Center, located in Boston’s historic South End, is a private, not-for-profit, 496-bed, academic medical center and the primary teaching affiliate for Boston University School of Medicine. Recognized for its high-quality, nationally ranked and comprehensive medical care for the entire family, patients have access to the most current treatment and advancements at BMC. BMC physicians lead the way in pioneering new therapies that impact the care of patients locally and worldwide.

OTHER ARTICLES

Developing a Coronavirus Digital Marketing Strategy for Healthcare

Article | April 2, 2020

Healthcare organizations are scrambling right now to stay on top of Coronavirus while also providing world-class care to other patients with various healthcare needs. This becomes a problem for marketing teams to not only stay consistent in their messaging and marketing priorities but also in shifting focus to this new uncertain reality we’re all facing. There is no blueprint for what’s happening right now, but there are steps we can take to help keep the momentum moving forward.To start, healthcare marketing teams should first focus on how they are communicating about Coronavirus to their community and patients, and how their digital marketing channels (such as SEO, paid media, content marketing, and social media) fit into that message. At Marcel Digital, we’re currently working with our healthcare clients to shift digital marketing strategies to fit this new mold. Here’s what we’re telling them.

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How Blockchain Technology Will Improve Mobile Healthcare

Article | March 27, 2020

The key concerns of healthcare management today are data processing and data security. Patients don’t have full ownership of their medical records, and are unable to control how their information is updated. There isn’t enough transparency to the process. There are also significant concerns related to data security, especially in the areas of personalized medicine and the rise of wearables. Patients and medical staff need secure and straightforward ways to record data, send it over networks, and receive advice without security concerns. Blockchain technology can help solve these problems. Introduced in 2008 as a means of recording cryptocurrency transactions, blockchain is a distributed cloud-based ledger that offers the ability to verify the origin of data and prevent breaches. When a user wants to make a transaction, they issue a request signed with their private key. The network verifies its authenticity by using a public key. If the verification is successful, the transaction is broadcast to the network and included in a block. The network of “miners” solves the block to get a reward, and once the block is revealed, it is added to the blockchain, making it permanent. It’s impossible to introduce new information in a block unnoticed, because that would change the structure of the entire chain. This feature makes the system safe and transparent.

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Setting Expectations in a Complex Healthcare System

Article | February 18, 2020

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Identity + RBAC Tighten Security in Healthcare

Article | March 6, 2020

As worries about coronavirus (also known as COVID-19) mount daily, healthcare and health care organizations work valiantly to deliver quality healthcare. Potential exposure of health care workers to COVID-19 risks further shortages of hospital staff and clinical service providers. This presents a security challenge in rapidly authorizing individuals to fill needed roles as they are temporarily vacated. Role-based access control (RBAC) has long been the standard many organizations adhere to when establishing security and limiting access to resources. In a rapidly changing environment RBAC alone falls short of meeting data privacy and security needs. Implementation of role-based access controls (RBAC) alone no longer aligns with the needs of modern healthcare or the incorporation of cloud software and ecosystems. RBAC indicates the use of static roles and groups to restrict access to sensitive data and critical systems with a set it and forget it mindset. In the past RBAC alone was sufficient, but cloud migration strategies and a fluid workforce require time-bound access to maintain proper governance. Healthcare organizations have a dynamic structure and must accommodate individuals working in varying shifts, multiple clinics, or research areas, which requires shifting permissions depending on their duties at a given time. RBAC alone simply cannot keep pace with modern healthcare security needs.

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Spotlight

Boston Medical Center (BMC)

Boston Medical Center, located in Boston’s historic South End, is a private, not-for-profit, 496-bed, academic medical center and the primary teaching affiliate for Boston University School of Medicine. Recognized for its high-quality, nationally ranked and comprehensive medical care for the entire family, patients have access to the most current treatment and advancements at BMC. BMC physicians lead the way in pioneering new therapies that impact the care of patients locally and worldwide.

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